Youth center – Jukuz http://jukuz.net/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 16:16:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jukuz.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/jukuz-150x150.png Youth center – Jukuz http://jukuz.net/ 32 32 A “trial” roller skating event. Permanent Skating Eye Organizer/Youth Home https://jukuz.net/a-trial-roller-skating-event-permanent-skating-eye-organizer-youth-home/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 13:38:20 +0000 https://jukuz.net/a-trial-roller-skating-event-permanent-skating-eye-organizer-youth-home/ A day of family and adult fun is planned for Saturday, October 22 at the old Skate Palace, 1855 E. Knox St. in Galesburg. Roller skating is back in Galesburg. Whether this is just a one-day event or a more permanent entertainment option remains to be seen. A day of family and adult fun is […]]]>

A day of family and adult fun is planned for Saturday, October 22 at the old Skate Palace, 1855 E. Knox St. in Galesburg.

Roller skating is back in Galesburg. Whether this is just a one-day event or a more permanent entertainment option remains to be seen.

A day of family and adult fun is planned for Saturday, October 22 at the old Skate Palace, 1855 E. Knox St. in Galesburg. The event, sponsored by Michael Spinks and nonprofit All-Stars Sports Academy, will feature roller skating for all ages from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. There will also be other games and contests, a pitch speed radar gun and food trucks on place.

A suggested donation of $5 includes skate rental.

An adult skate for ages 21 and up—with DJs—will take place from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. on October 22 at the Skate Palace.

The skating event requires pre-registration. E-mail allstarssportsacademy@gmail.com or visit the event registration page.

Spinks will lease the facility for the skating event. He said he would eventually like to buy the 12,000 square foot Skate Palace building and the six acres of land it sits on. Skate Palace closed in 2019.

“This event is kind of a test to see how the community evolves,” Spinks said. “Is there an interest for people who still want to skate? We no longer have an ice rink or a bowling ally. There really is nowhere to go for these 5-18 year olds.

If Spinks were to eventually acquire the Skate Palace, he said he would like to include an arcade, batting cages, and putt-putt golf within the rink complex.

Spinks, on behalf of his company All-Star Sports Academy, recently received $10,000 in down payment assistance from the Southside Occupancy Assistance Program to acquire and demolish the structure at 2085 Grand Ave. There he plans to establish a new building for his business which includes batting cages, arcade games and a small retail space.

“All of this isn’t just for the South Side, it’s for the whole community,” Spinks said. “I grew up at the Carver Center. Nothing can replace the Carver Center, but I want to have a place for the kids to go.

Spinks is seeking sponsors and donations to help offset the cost of the event and for the future development of All-Stars Sports Academy. E-mail allstarssportsacademy@gmail.com for more information.

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Attic Youth Center offers services to LGBTQIA+ youth in Philadelphia – The Hawk Newspaper https://jukuz.net/attic-youth-center-offers-services-to-lgbtqia-youth-in-philadelphia-the-hawk-newspaper/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 14:04:17 +0000 https://jukuz.net/attic-youth-center-offers-services-to-lgbtqia-youth-in-philadelphia-the-hawk-newspaper/ Rainbow artwork pasted on a red brick wall marks the start of a ramp that leads to a large gray door tucked into a corner and hidden from busy South 16th Street in downtown Philadelphia. Behind the door is The Attic Youth Center, a colorful space designed to welcome Philadelphia-area LGBTQIA+ youth, help them feel […]]]>

Rainbow artwork pasted on a red brick wall marks the start of a ramp that leads to a large gray door tucked into a corner and hidden from busy South 16th Street in downtown Philadelphia.

Behind the door is The Attic Youth Center, a colorful space designed to welcome Philadelphia-area LGBTQIA+ youth, help them feel comfortable, and give them a chance to socialize with others their own age, according to Jasper Liem, Acting Executive Director.

“Even if they go to a school where there are other LGBTQ youth or students, it’s different from being in a place where you know everyone is part of your community,” Liem said.

The Attic, which serves youth ages 14-23, offers counselling, hygiene product distribution, food pantry, housing placement, LGBTQ training to outside organizations and businesses, and after-school programs, all completely free.

“We started on the top floor of an organization called Voyage House, which was the first organization, I believe, in Philadelphia to help homeless youth,” said Ingrid Abrams, housing specialist at The Attic. “We were literally herded into their attic. This is where the name “The Attic” was born.

After a long day at college where homophobia and transphobia run rampant, Brianna Swan, a trans student who attends The Attic, said The Attic was where she wanted to be.

“I come here for friends,” Swan said. “I come here to talk to my favorite employees, I come here and do a [support] group, I come here for games, I come here for snacks too.”

During the pandemic, The Attic began advertising Youth Supply Drop Day for LGBTQ youth to come and pick up all the supplies they needed, like pantry items, toiletries, cleaning products, and more. era, hand sanitizer and masks. Although The Attic has offered basic necessities since it opened in 1993, staff recognized the increased need for these supplies in the community, so they advertised them more, Liem said.

When the lockdown started, supplies were available for pickup on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. But now customers can come in and pick up supplies whenever The Attic is open. The organization serves between 40 and 50 young people each day it is open, Liem said.

Many young LGBTQ people come to The Attic looking for safe housing, according to Abrams. Although the organization does not have residential facilities, people like Abrams help young people find “very LGBTQ-friendly” housing, she said.

“A lot of people coming in have left the house,” Abrams said. “It’s all about society and their carers not accepting their sexuality, so they often come to Le Grenier looking for help trying to find safe accommodation.

Abrams, who has been involved with The Attic since it opened 30 years ago, said covid-19 has only complicated the process of finding safe housing for LGBTQ youth.

“The job was already extremely difficult with all the systematic and societal barriers that have always existed for people who are not even part of the LGBTQ community,” Abrams said. “Housing, education, low income, lack of jobs – it’s a common denominator for young black and brown people. And most, if not all, of the people we serve come from that demographic.

The pandemic has complicated more than housing. It also increased mental health issues, Liem said.

“I think the pandemic has had a very difficult negative impact on not just us, but everyone’s mental health,” Liem said. “For a lot of LGBT youth, that meant they were locked in with family or adults or in relationships that weren’t the most assertive.”

According to the 2022 National LGBTQ Mental Health Survey conducted by The Trevor Project, only 37% of LGBTQ youth identified their home or school as a space for LGBTQ affirmation. And of the 82% of LGBTQ youth who wanted mental health care, 60% couldn’t get it.

Adapt to current challenges

– both internally and externally – has been the hallmark of the organization since its inception. But The Attic’s core mission remains: to be a “sweet spot” for young people that offers structure, safety and knowledge, said Shimmy Gray, who has been with The Attic since 2004. In August, Gray began working at The Attic to raise awareness for HIV as coordinator of PhRESH.

“[If] we don’t have those types of spaces, so outdoor spaces are set up for self-destruction and failure,” Gray said. “If we don’t get comfortable and build a safe space here or in any LGBT youth center in Philadelphia, and we don’t start small, we won’t survive big. And the outside is bigger than the inside, bigger than the building itself. And we can’t control them once they come out. And once they entered the big world, at least they were prepared.

Madelyn Morrison, director of the Bryson Institute at The Attic, which offers training that teaches affirmation practices for working with members of the LGBTQ community, said her journey with The Attic began when she was only 14 years old. The Attic was a place she could go that gave her purpose and “reignited a voice” that pushed her towards this work.

“I wanted to become a force, a warrior in the city to fight against these things [queer and trans issues]”, Morrison said. “It’s important to me because I’m becoming what I needed when I was young. I have to do this, not just for the inner child that still lives in me, but for the many different generations that have come after me who really needed that support. And I’m grateful that I was able to give back, to pour love into those communities and those generations.

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Youth Center Counselor (part-time weekday mornings) https://jukuz.net/youth-center-counselor-part-time-weekday-mornings/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 12:42:40 +0000 https://jukuz.net/youth-center-counselor-part-time-weekday-mornings/ Job Summary:The Youth Center Counselor is responsible for all duties related to the provision of child supervision services at our state-of-the-art child supervision facility, also known as “The Treehouse”. Prepares, directs and supervises games and activities that provide appropriate social interactions while adhering to all health and safety procedures. Hours:• The schedule is based on […]]]>

Job Summary:
The Youth Center Counselor is responsible for all duties related to the provision of child supervision services at our state-of-the-art child supervision facility, also known as “The Treehouse”. Prepares, directs and supervises games and activities that provide appropriate social interactions while adhering to all health and safety procedures.

Hours:
• The schedule is based on weekly shifts watching the children in the tree house.
• Must be available 10-15 hours per week.
• Availability requirements include – Tuesday to Saturday weekday mornings leading up to afternoons
• Typical shifts – 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Essential functions:
• Ensures knowledge of club policies and procedures as they relate to the youth department
• Ensures knowledge of all safety protocol and first aid procedures, and proactive in accident prevention
• Helps plan age-appropriate activities for children and families
• Greets children and parents by name in a professional and friendly manner
• Communicates with parents during drop-off and pick-up regarding their child’s specific needs and preferences
• Interacts with children in a friendly way by playing games, teaching skills, etc.
• Properly handles and maintains all event center and child supervision materials, with proper storage after use
• Directs and supervises play and activities during Child Supervision Center shifts
• Help with diaper changes, bathroom supervision, meals and snacks
• Recommends new ideas for toys, programs, supplies and promotions
• Performs opening and closing duties to ensure a clean and safe work area in the child care center
• Resolves disputes between children if necessary
• Disciplines using verbal redirection, physical withdrawal and time out, where appropriate
• Communicates with and informs immediate supervisors of any unforeseen circumstances and reacts appropriately
• Assistance with lunch/dinner service with regards to youth activities
• Maintains a safe and clean environment
• Demonstrates good phone etiquette
• Attend all department staff meetings and trainings
• Performs other assigned duties

Qualifications and Requirements:
• High school diploma or equivalent
• Valid first aid and infant/child CPR certifications
• Six months of experience working with groups of children aged 6 months to 12 years old
• Ability to communicate effectively, fluent English
• Ability to work outdoors in all seasons
• Ability to provide basic hygiene services for young children
• Ability to provide a supportive and caring environment, while supervising children
• Must have a positive, upbeat, friendly attitude and enjoy providing five-star customer service
• Must be a team player who can develop strong and positive working relationships with all staff

Physical requirements:
• Must be able to climb stairs
• Must be able to lift 50 lbs. Daily
• Constantly walks and stands, reaches, bends, lifts, carries and bends down
• Washes hands frequently

Advantages:
Our team members are a friendly group of professionals! We enjoy a beautiful environment, free meals, employee outings and events, and golf and tennis privileges. We have a positive work environment with a dedicated, hardworking and fun team.

Pre-employment screening:
Background check and drug test required. We are a drug-free workplace.

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Reopening of the after-school center for young people at Cascade Galleria | Local News https://jukuz.net/reopening-of-the-after-school-center-for-young-people-at-cascade-galleria-local-news/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/reopening-of-the-after-school-center-for-young-people-at-cascade-galleria-local-news/ An old African proverb says: “It takes a whole village to raise a child”. However, for Laura Colvin, this village lacks an important piece: a community center as a place where children can meet and express themselves in a positive way after school and off the streets. That’s why years ago, Colvin, who retired from […]]]>

An old African proverb says: “It takes a whole village to raise a child”.

However, for Laura Colvin, this village lacks an important piece: a community center as a place where children can meet and express themselves in a positive way after school and off the streets.

That’s why years ago, Colvin, who retired from the US Army, started the after-school program Game Changer.

Game Changer, an after-school mentorship program for youth in grades 6-12, operates under the auspices of the non-profit Faith, Hope and Charity Corporation and will reopen inside the Cascade Galleria in New Castle under the name of The Village.

After being located inside Epworth United Methodist Church for the past few years, it will now have space in the former Towne Shopping Center with an open day scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday.

“We’re making ‘Game Changers’,” Colvin said.

Colvin said children and teens are constantly bombarded with different “risk factors,” such as their economic status, living and environmental conditions, trauma, and overall boredom.

She said these factors can lead to students misbehaving, not caring or falling behind in school, or turning to drugs and alcohol.

“We really have a drug problem here (in New Castle),” Colvin said.

Colvin said that with the Sankey Center closed during the pandemic, there are few places for city kids to go out to stay off the streets.

That’s why she thinks Game Changer is important, as it will not only serve as a place for students to focus on their academic, athletic, and artistic achievements, but will also serve as a place for children to learn about the dangers of drugs and “gateway drugs”. .”

Game Changer will feature six different programs, or as Colvin calls them “templates,” each with its own room and space.

There will be a room dedicated to education, which will allow students to benefit from assistance at school.

There will be a sports program where in the future students can discuss and engage in different sports and outdoor activities.

There will be a community service program, an employment program focusing on career goals, professional development and job readiness, an empowerment program to help motivate and boost student morale, and a artistic program, which will allow students to develop their skills. in music, art, theater and dance.

Specifically, there will be a music room and recording studio called “The Vault”, which will allow students to perform and record their own music.

Students can join a book club and all participants will be required to complete at least 1-2 hours of community service per month to show their sense of responsibility to their community.

Colvin said that every student should have a foundation in their life, whether good or bad, and she hopes programs like these can give a student a good foundation.

“I see Game Changer as a protective factor. We just want to help,” Colvin said. “If we can only reach one child, that will be enough.”

Colvin said each piece has a quote above and inside to consistently show each student’s empowerment.

She said all programs are free and funded by contributions and grants from the local community, and all workers are properly screened and unpaid volunteers.

She also stated that Game Changer is meant to be an extension and complement to other existing after-school programs, and not meant to be a competition with them.

All rooms will be equipped with air purifiers to treat illnesses like flu and COVID-19.

Colvin said that each year, Game Changer will strive to have a benefit talent show called “Artistically Inclined”, with the theme “Love is the Cure”, which will allow students in the artistic program to showcase their skills and their creativity.

After its grand opening, Game Changer will be open from 5 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays, although Colvin said she would like to host Friday family night and would like it to be open seven days a week. .

She said the topic of drug prevention is important to her because she lost her husband to drug addiction last year.

She called the experience heartbreaking and wants to make sure no student or their family has to go through this.

Although she is happy with the opening of the new Galleria space, she admits that it is not as spacious as she would like, especially if there are a lot of students who want to enroll. . She also called on building owners and municipal authorities to create a real community center.

“We’re missing something in the village,” Colvin said. “Our goal is to get a building for the village.”

For more information on the program or to join, call (423) 838-0203.

nvercilla@ncnewsonline.com

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Local youth center continues summer mural program to increase representation in Isla Vista https://jukuz.net/local-youth-center-continues-summer-mural-program-to-increase-representation-in-isla-vista/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/local-youth-center-continues-summer-mural-program-to-increase-representation-in-isla-vista/ Students and volunteers from the St. George Youth Center completed two new murals in Estero Park this summer – a floral theme and an ocean sunset – with help from the Campus Conexiónes introduction program. The St. George Youth Center plans to build more murals in the summer of 2023. Maddy Fangio/Daily Nexus The program […]]]>

Students and volunteers from the St. George Youth Center completed two new murals in Estero Park this summer – a floral theme and an ocean sunset – with help from the Campus Conexiónes introduction program.

The St. George Youth Center plans to build more murals in the summer of 2023. Maddy Fangio/Daily Nexus

The program was coordinated by Stephanie Arguera, a recent Ph.D. graduate from UC Santa Barbara Gevirtz School, with support from the Center for Publicly Engaged Scholarship and Dr. Rebeca Mireles-Rios from the Department of Education.

The youth center teens began the project in the winter 2022 term, participating in weekly workshops and activities with Latinx students, faculty, and staff at UCSB. In the spring, the center’s teen leadership group began the design process by brainstorming, sketching and voting on potential mural ideas.

“I was involved in brainstorming ideas and we all helped draw a final draft and stencils for the flower mural,” said eighth-grade student and muralist Diego Lopez. “I like that as a team we were able to think of some really good ideas and move the project forward faster.”

The group chose the two models after multiple sketches, stencils and cardboard models. Works from previous years included depictions of sea animals, nature scenes, quotes, and more depictions of youth in IV. A total of six murals have been painted by the youth center since 2017, including the two most recent additions.

“We really dig the theme and work it out because the first idea always sounds good, but it’s always important to take time and come back to it,” Arguera said.

Painting of the murals began in June after the designs received approval from the IV Recreation & Park District. A team of 20 teenagers from the youth center, along with Arguera and other community volunteers, completed the installations in about two weeks. A ribbon-cutting ceremony held on June 27 celebrated the unveiling of the two murals.

This year’s project marked a return to regular operations for St. George’s Youth Center, following disruptions to its operations during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Arguera.

“The kids at the teen center are usually looking forward to a big project in the summer, so having that rug removed from under you is definitely a drag,” Arguera said. “But I would say [this year] was not as easy as previous years. I think we’re all coming back to that sense of normalcy, so putting that back into practice was different from previous years.

Lopez, who frequently attends the youth center, noted that he appreciates all the activities and support available at the center.

“I like going to the teen center and not just straight home because it’s always a good time there,” Lopez said. “I love playing Speed ​​with Raul and Connect Four. Sometimes we even cook food and play games to win prizes.

After weeks in the summer heat, with snacks and supplies provided by the center, Arguera described the murals as a creation of the young people.

“My favorite part is just seeing the sense of accomplishment and ownership over a pretty big piece of art that’s public and they’re going to see for years,” she said. “It takes an investment, but it does it all the time.”

Since the project was completed in June, part of the sunset mural has been defaced with graffiti. The center has not yet been able to remove the graffiti, according to youth center director Raul Macias, who also said the majority of the graffiti took place on a white wall nearby.

“We noticed and we all felt sad and asked why people would do that to a kid’s mural,” Lopez said. “I hope we fix it soon.”

The St. George Youth Center plans to build more murals in the summer of 2023. Beyond painting, the center offers after-school and summer programs for students in grades 5-12, including cooking classes, robotics training, tutoring and various sports.

“The center is essentially a haven for the local community, teenagers and families,” Macias said. “Isla Vista is a unique location with a high percentage of college population, so we serve the underserved family and teen community.”

A version of this article originally appeared on p. __ from the September 22, 2022 print edition of the Daily Nexus.

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Wednesday’s Child – Profiles of youth centers https://jukuz.net/wednesdays-child-profiles-of-youth-centers/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 03:52:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/wednesdays-child-profiles-of-youth-centers/ TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – Every week we feature kids who are up for adoption, we call them our Wednesday kids. Tonight, Lori Hutchinson talks with our Child Wednesday partner, Foster Adopt Connect, about a new program that gives kids more control when they connect with families. “They want to be adopted, but they don’t like […]]]>

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – Every week we feature kids who are up for adoption, we call them our Wednesday kids.

Tonight, Lori Hutchinson talks with our Child Wednesday partner, Foster Adopt Connect, about a new program that gives kids more control when they connect with families.

“They want to be adopted, but they don’t like the way it’s done,” says adoption specialist Jordan Johnson. “They are uncomfortable.”

This is where a new program called Youth Center Profiles comes in. Johnson says it gives teens a chance to control their recruitment. It is a collaborative process that empowers the child.

“We meet a few times and get to know the kids and they tell us what they want recruiting to look like, which is important to them,” Johnson explained. “It’s different from our photo list when we get a photo and write a story about them. They decide that story.

Johnson said the response has been positive as children get behind the wheel to navigate their own future.

“Instead of feeling like they don’t have control over how they’re perceived online or what adoption recruitment will look like for them. They have the opportunity to work together, collaborate and be heard.

If you can give a child their own family, call Adopt Kansas Kids at 877-457-5430 or go to adoptkskids.org. They also feature children on the Adopt Kansas Kids Facebook page.

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Perdue Farms donates thousands of pounds of food to Detroit youth center https://jukuz.net/perdue-farms-donates-thousands-of-pounds-of-food-to-detroit-youth-center/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 02:43:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/perdue-farms-donates-thousands-of-pounds-of-food-to-detroit-youth-center/ DETROIT (WXYZ) — This is a major act of giving, lifting spirits and caring for the children who are our future. In East Detroit, a food company invests in children to ensure no one goes hungry at a youth center that serves more than 100 children a day. For families whose children attend the SAY […]]]>

DETROIT (WXYZ) — This is a major act of giving, lifting spirits and caring for the children who are our future.

In East Detroit, a food company invests in children to ensure no one goes hungry at a youth center that serves more than 100 children a day.

For families whose children attend the SAY Detroit Play Center on the east side, it is essential that they provide nutritious meals for children. That’s part of the reason they’re so grateful for a £4,000 donation from Perdue Farms.

“There is a lot of ego associated with hunger. Some come to work and are hungry because they mean nothing and are treated without dignity,” said Jerome Record, a parent.

He’s been through tough times before and says he’s had to rely on the kindness of others.

“Any place that provides resources to our community, but also does it with dignity, is tough,” said Jerome, whose children attend the center, which offers tutoring, mentoring, sports and other opportunities so that children participate in activities.

“When they come to our after-school program, they get a meal, sometimes they get lunch at school. But then, at the center, they have something to learn. If the brain works, it helps them learn better,” said director Herb Hayden.

Hayden told 7 Action News that a check for $10,000 was also delivered with the chicken for the meals.

“A lot of families, especially in our area, are being hit hard. It goes a long way,” Jerome said.

We learned that the Gleaners Community Food Bank, a respected Metro Detroit organization, is also involved in helping provide some of the food to those in need.

**Correction: A previous version of this story listed an incorrect amount for the donated chicken. We regret the error which has been corrected.

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Officials consider new closing date for New Hampshire youth center https://jukuz.net/officials-consider-new-closing-date-for-new-hampshire-youth-center/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 11:12:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/officials-consider-new-closing-date-for-new-hampshire-youth-center/ A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety. The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago but has boiled over amid horrific allegations of sexual abuse. […]]]>

A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety.

The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago but has boiled over amid horrific allegations of sexual abuse. Frustrated with spending $13 million a year to operate a 144-bed facility for a dozen teenagers, lawmakers set a mandatory March 1 closing date. But the center’s fate remains uncertain after lawmakers could not agree this year on how to replace it.

Sign up for NHPR’s Rundown newsletter to get more news delivered to your inbox.

Rep. Jess Edwards, R-Auburn, said Friday he plans to introduce two bills for the legislative session that begins in January: one to extend the three-month deadline and another that calls for a new installation of 12 to 14 beds, with room for 18 if required. He told Deputy Health Commissioner Lori Weaver he was worried about what would happen on March 1 without such measures.

“The Legislature has let you down,” he said. “We just couldn’t come to an agreement, so we didn’t give you anything in the way of money to plan and design it.”

Weaver said she could not predict the population of the center six months in advance, but based on the current situation, “there would be a definite impact on public safety” if the deadline arrived without further indication. .

“If this were to happen today, I could tell you that there would be a public risk for some of these young people to be placed in situations that would not only be dangerous for them, but potentially for the community as well,” he said. she said Friday at a meeting of the Health and Social Services Oversight Committee.

The youth center, named after former governor John H. Sununu, has been under criminal investigation since 2019 and 11 former workers were arrested last year. The state recently established a $100 million fund to settle claims filed by nearly 450 former residents who sued the state over abuse allegations involving more than 150 staff members from 1963 to 2018.

In recent weeks, police have intervened at the facility on several occasions to help staff deal with the disturbances. Weaver told lawmakers the incidents were not unusual, but a severe understaffing coupled with the “toughest kids” created a “perfect storm” that required outside help. Lawmakers recently approved salary increases for staff, but recruitment remains a challenge given the impending shutdown date, she said.

“I think there are a lot of people who want to come and help and work,” she said, adding that the closing date “overshadows the facility for sure.”

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Saving Our Kids Banquet seeks to fund youth center for at-risk children | Local News https://jukuz.net/saving-our-kids-banquet-seeks-to-fund-youth-center-for-at-risk-children-local-news/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 21:17:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/saving-our-kids-banquet-seeks-to-fund-youth-center-for-at-risk-children-local-news/ Tickets and sponsorships are available for a Saturday banquet aimed at saving Tulsa children from a life of poverty and crime. The Christian Ministers Alliance’s 15th Annual Saving Our Kids-Legends Banquet will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 24 at the Doubletree Downtown Tulsa Hotel, 616 W. Seventh St. Gesell Scott Gesell, CEO […]]]>

Tickets and sponsorships are available for a Saturday banquet aimed at saving Tulsa children from a life of poverty and crime.

The Christian Ministers Alliance’s 15th Annual Saving Our Kids-Legends Banquet will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 24 at the Doubletree Downtown Tulsa Hotel, 616 W. Seventh St.






Gesell


Scott Gesell, CEO of Gateway Mortgage, will be the guest speaker, and the Fayetteville High School Choir will provide music for the evening, said Reverend WR Casey Jr., president of the AMC. Dinner is included.

Honorees include current or former Tulsa-area civic leaders, business executives, and media personalities.

The CMA is a 55-year-old Tulsa organization dedicated to serving the North Tulsa community. The nonprofit organization holds regular holiday food and toy drives, school supply drives and monthly food giveaways, and it works with a number of schools to coordinate college scholarships for students.

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The banquet’s title comes from the nonprofit’s goal of building a youth center at Apache Street and Lewis Avenue.

It’s an estimated $7.5 million dream that Casey has been working towards for at least eight years, but there’s no sign of her hopes waning.

“When you look at families, you see the need for programs to help them,” Casey said. “My heart is to help those who are less fortunate than others. It is the heart of the Alliance of Christian Ministers, and it is the heart of Jesus.

In a fundraising letter, Casey wrote that the underlying causes of juvenile delinquency are no secret: poverty, drugs, single-parent homes, gang involvement and lack of good role models.

“Kids with nothing to do and nowhere to go after school and on weekends and in the summer make them especially vulnerable to falling into the wrong crowd and becoming one of Tulsa’s statistics,” a writes Casey. “They need a place to go to participate in healthy, productive activities and be around caring adults.”

A youth center north of Tulsa would be a place where children can “get off the streets and out of harm’s way”, “a place where our children can become the best versions of themselves”.

CMA acquired 4 acres of land at the intersection, but Casey said he needed an additional three acres currently occupied by a vacant and occupied house, a tire store and an empty half-acre lot. . The additional space would allow for a gymnasium, playground, swimming pool, classroom, computer lab, kitchen, dining room and daycare.

The nonprofit has received $242,000 in donations so far, Casey said, not including in-kind donations, and he shared a list of donors with the Tulsa World that reached six business pages. , leading organizations, foundations and individuals in the region.

“It’s what the Lord has given me, and with God anything is possible,” Casey said of the vision. “I think we are close to that happening, we just need some help.”

During his ministry, Casey said he visited homes in Tulsa without food or running water. He said the Tulsans needed to be moved into action so that they did not fall into the role of priest or Levite in the biblical parable of the Good Samaritan, where each walked past a man in desperate need.

“If you’ve had your whole life and never had to want anything, then you wouldn’t understand people who have nothing,” Casey said. “We need to reach those with deep pockets so they can see the need for those who don’t and help us help them.”

Individual tickets are $100 and tables for 10 are available for $1,000. Booth spaces are available for $250. Corporate sponsorships range from $1,500 to $100,000.

To purchase tickets, corporate sponsorship or arrange a donation, call Casey at 918-951-7407 or 918-902-1374. Checks should be made out to CMA Inc. Building Fund and mailed to PO Box 2095, Tulsa, OK, 74101.

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Authorities consider extending closure date of New Hampshire youth center https://jukuz.net/authorities-consider-extending-closure-date-of-new-hampshire-youth-center/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 20:29:45 +0000 https://jukuz.net/authorities-consider-extending-closure-date-of-new-hampshire-youth-center/ CONCORD, NH — A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety. The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago, but has boiled over amid horrific allegations […]]]>

CONCORD, NH — A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety.

The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago, but has boiled over amid horrific allegations of sexual abuse. Frustrated with spending $13 million a year to operate a 144-bed facility for a dozen teenagers, lawmakers set a mandatory March 1 closing date. But the center’s fate remains uncertain after lawmakers could not agree this year on how to replace it.

Rep. Jess Edwards, R-Auburn, said Friday he plans to introduce two bills for the legislative session that begins in January: one to extend the three-month deadline and another that calls for a new installation of 12 to 14 beds, with room for 18 if required. He told Deputy Health Commissioner Lori Weaver he was worried about what would happen on March 1 without such measures.

“The Legislature has let you down,” he said. “We just couldn’t come to an agreement, so we didn’t give you anything in the way of money to plan and design it.”

Weaver said she could not predict the population of the center six months in advance, but based on the current situation, “there would be a definite impact on public safety” if the deadline arrived without further indication. .

“If this were to happen today, I could tell you that there would be a public risk for some of these young people to be placed in situations that would not only be dangerous for them, but potentially for the community as well,” he said. she said Friday at a meeting of the Health and Social Services Oversight Committee.

The youth center, named after former governor John H. Sununu, has been under criminal investigation since 2019 and 11 former workers were arrested last year. The state recently established a $100 million fund to settle claims filed by nearly 450 former residents who sued the state over abuse allegations involving more than 150 staff members from 1963 to 2018.

In recent weeks, police have intervened at the facility on several occasions to help staff deal with the disturbances. Weaver told lawmakers the incidents were not unusual, but a severe understaffing coupled with the “toughest kids” created a “perfect storm” that required outside help. Lawmakers recently approved salary increases for staff, but recruitment remains a challenge given the impending shutdown date, she said.

“I think there are a lot of people who want to come and help and work,” she said, adding that the closing date “overshadows the facility for sure.”

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