Youth center – Jukuz http://jukuz.net/ Wed, 25 May 2022 13:55:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jukuz.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/jukuz-150x150.png Youth center – Jukuz http://jukuz.net/ 32 32 St. Mary’s Church wants to add a youth center https://jukuz.net/st-marys-church-wants-to-add-a-youth-center/ Tue, 24 May 2022 09:00:17 +0000 https://jukuz.net/st-marys-church-wants-to-add-a-youth-center/ EAST BRUNSWICK — St. Mary’s Coptic Orthodox Church wants to build a 14,470-square-foot youth center on its 8.8-acre property at the corner of Riva Avenue and Hardenburg Lane. The church’s application is scheduled for a public hearing before the township’s zoning adjustment board in the municipal complex at 7:30 p.m. on June 2. Plans call […]]]>
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The deadline is approaching for the closure of the youth center https://jukuz.net/the-deadline-is-approaching-for-the-closure-of-the-youth-center/ Mon, 23 May 2022 22:53:57 +0000 https://jukuz.net/the-deadline-is-approaching-for-the-closure-of-the-youth-center/ Lawmakers last year gave the state Department of Health and Human Services until March 1, 2023 to close the Sununu Youth Services Center and relocate the five to 10 minors who are usually there. detained. Last week they killed the bill that would have given the department the money, the guidance and the power to […]]]>

Lawmakers last year gave the state Department of Health and Human Services until March 1, 2023 to close the Sununu Youth Services Center and relocate the five to 10 minors who are usually there. detained. Last week they killed the bill that would have given the department the money, the guidance and the power to meet that deadline.

Unless lawmakers fast-track legislation in the next session extending the deadline, the department will have to send minors out of state if it can’t find other options here. “I think we have to (act quickly) because this state would be at a lot of risk if we hadn’t done anything” before March 1, said Sen. Cindy Rosenwald, a Nashua Democrat who has been working on this issue for years. .

In an emailed statement, Health and Human Services spokesman Jake Leon said the agency saw no option but to seek approval from the Legislature to build. a new facility.

“The state continues to have an obligation to provide children with an appropriate level of care in an appropriate setting,” he said. “Youths on trial in New Hampshire should be institutionalized or detained in an appropriate setting. As (Sununu Youth Services Center) is the only facility in the state that meets this standard, and out-of-state alternatives are largely unavailable and certainly not in the best interests of a child or family, we remain committed to securing a legislative resolution by March 2023.

Both houses passed Senate Bill 458, but each made changes that the other ultimately did not accept. A last-ditch effort Thursday to find a compromise fell through when House negotiators insisted that a new facility have only 12 beds and their Senate counterparts insisted that there be 12 with the possibility of add six. Rosenwald argued that the extra beds would provide space for increased admissions, but would be intended to provide space to separate children for safety reasons.

To alleviate concerns that the department would routinely fill extra beds, Rosenwald proposed allowing the department to hire enough staff to watch only 12 children, not 18.

“I think of it as a number of beds more than a number of children,” she said Thursday during the House and Senate negotiations. “If we allow them to employ up to 18 people, guess what? They go.”

Late Thursday afternoon, Senator Sharon Carson, Republican for Londonderry and chair of the committee negotiating a resolution, concluded that the disagreement over the beds was insurmountable.

“I don’t see a convergence of minds on this particular issue,” she told the committee. “I think we are at an impasse.

SB 458’s demise came after months of negotiations between lawmakers, health and human services and attorneys. After a number of amendments, the bill won the support of children’s advocates.

“It’s better. It really is better,” Karen Rosenberg, policy director of the Disability Rights Center of New Hampshire, told lawmakers at the meeting. “Perfection is the day every child receives their treatment even before to commit any offense and we never have children there. I wish we were there. We are not there yet.

In an email Friday, Rosenberg said his organization was concerned there were no plans after the center closed.

“We are disappointed that the Legislative Assembly was unable to compromise on a solution that would allow for a smooth transition from (Sununu Youth Services Center) to a state-run therapeutic facility” , she said. “Since, under current law, (the center) is required to close on March 1, 2023, we are concerned that, without a suitable alternative in the state, the needs of some of New Hampshire’s most vulnerable children will not be met. .”

There has long been bipartisan support for the closure of the 144-bed Sununu Youth Services Centre, a gated facility in Manchester for juveniles aged 13 to 17 brought to justice. The size of a new establishment was the roadblock.

In an effort to reduce the need for a large juvenile detention center, lawmakers have taken steps in recent years to divert children away from the center and into in-home treatment and support services for them and their families. . Lawmakers also tightened the types of offenses that make a child eligible for internment and created the Office of the Children’s Advocate, an independent watchdog on the state’s handling of juvenile cases.

SB 458 would have further limited the ability of courts to engage youth and expanded their ability to seek alternative solutions. The bill would have required the state to operate the facility, a priority for child welfare advocates who said privatizing it would limit the state’s ability to monitor residents’ treatment.

Sen. Gary Daniels, a Republican from Milford, sponsored SB 458 based on recommendations from a review committee he chaired this summer. These recommendations included an 18-bed, state-run, locked facility with a family-like design where minors received therapeutic and trauma-informed care.

In an interview, Daniels said he expects work on another tentative fix to begin soon.

“I think the Legislature and the department are going to have a lot of work to do this summer,” he said, “and try to find a solution that will meet the directive given by the Legislature” to close the facility before on March 1, 2023.

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Cove Youth Center Student Council Recognized – Crookston Times https://jukuz.net/cove-youth-center-student-council-recognized-crookston-times/ Mon, 23 May 2022 17:20:49 +0000 https://jukuz.net/cove-youth-center-student-council-recognized-crookston-times/ Submitted Kacey Oswalt “I am so happy to be part of The Cove Youth Council. I’m so glad to have the opportunity to give my opinion. The main reason I go to The Cove is because it’s a safe place for me. Every time I step into the creek it’s like a whole new world […]]]>

Submitted

Kacey Oswalt

“I am so happy to be part of The Cove Youth Council. I’m so glad to have the opportunity to give my opinion. The main reason I go to The Cove is because it’s a safe place for me. Every time I step into the creek it’s like a whole new world full of positive energy. I enjoyed all the new friends I made at the creek. One last thing, I’m grateful to everyone who helped build this wonderful place. That’s why I go to the Cove.

Isabelle Phalen

“The Cove is like my sanctuary. I have the right to take a break from the world when I’m there. I am so honored to have been asked to be on board. I’m excited to have a say in things involving The Cove. I also look forward to having an excuse to go there more often. Long story short, I love The Cove and I’m so glad I can do my best to get more involved with it.

Nicholas Hall

“I really like to go there during the summer! It’s really nice to get away for a few hours even if you only go there once or twice a week! When I’m at The Cove everyone is off on their phones which is great because you can be ‘present’ in the moment and make memories with people! I can’t wait to see what this summer has in store for The Cove and all the young people involved! »

Rylee Anderson

“What The Cove means to me. The Cove is a fun place to unwind after a hard and stressful day at school, with or without friends. The Cove is always very attentive to students, and if you need a few thoughts on your day, you are welcome. Everyone is accepted at The Cove and appreciated for being you. The Cove is always ready to help you and any student around you.

Emilee Smith

“The Cove is like a family, there are always people there for you. The Cove is a welcoming place for everyone, no matter who you are. It’s a place to go whether you’re having a good day or a bad day, whether you need it or want it. It’s a place where you can make new friends and find new things you love to do. The Cove is an awesome place.

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Youth center proposal a boon for Flathead https://jukuz.net/youth-center-proposal-a-boon-for-flathead/ Sun, 22 May 2022 07:00:32 +0000 https://jukuz.net/youth-center-proposal-a-boon-for-flathead/ Last week the valley learned more about an exciting new project at the northern end of Kalispell which includes the creation of a huge year-round youth centre. The non-profit organization Flathead Valley Youth Center is spearheading efforts to bring the $30 million public facility to fruition. Located on Church Drive, just south of Majestic Valley […]]]>


Last week the valley learned more about an exciting new project at the northern end of Kalispell which includes the creation of a huge year-round youth centre.

The non-profit organization Flathead Valley Youth Center is spearheading efforts to bring the $30 million public facility to fruition. Located on Church Drive, just south of Majestic Valley Arena, organizers say the 140,000-square-foot center would provide children and teens with access to sports, recreation, arts and enrichment programs “that will boost self-esteem of oneself and promote a healthy lifestyle”.

Plans also call for an arts annex and so-called “partner spaces” for use by local nonprofits.

The center is part of a larger 40-acre development which also requires retail space and 102 residential units.

The community leaders behind the non-profit youth center cite the effects of “diminishing connections in our community, declining mental health among our young people, and rising teen suicide.” They wanted to create a place that would bring “immediate and long-term benefits” to the valley.

“We started talking about it for two years realizing that what the valley really needs is a safe place for young people that helps them empower themselves,” Tawnya Bingham, president, said last week. of the non-profit organization’s board of directors. “The youth center is designed as an inviting place where every child is welcome and where every child has a place.”

Don’t get me wrong, this facility would be a big deal for the valley – historic itself. And that represents exactly the kind of forward-thinking, community-based projects that can improve the overall quality of life for everyone who calls Flathead home.

Kudos to nonprofit board members Tawnya and Kelcey Bingham, and Tagen Vine for leading this venture. An advisory committee made up of Ryan Purdy, Kacy Howard, Andre Burba and Missy Jonson also attend.

Fundraising is ongoing and the group is actively seeking people with relevant experience who are willing to volunteer their time to the project.

For anyone who has complained about the development crush sweeping the valley, here is a chance to claim a project that has the potential to bring about real and positive change. Contribute, get involved, help make this vision a reality.

For more information visit www.fv-yc.org or email info@fv-yc.org

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The Carrie Townsend Foundation grants $2,500 to the Youth Center https://jukuz.net/the-carrie-townsend-foundation-grants-2500-to-the-youth-center/ Fri, 20 May 2022 16:01:36 +0000 https://jukuz.net/the-carrie-townsend-foundation-grants-2500-to-the-youth-center/ The Carrie Townsend Foundation recently awarded a $2,500 grant to the Youth Center to support its after-school and literacy programs. Carrie Townsend’s family founded the Carrie Townsend Foundation (CTF) to honor her quintessential life and “continue” her unwavering commitment to faithful generosity. CTF supports non-profit organizations and causes that have a significant impact on the […]]]>

The Carrie Townsend Foundation recently awarded a $2,500 grant to the Youth Center to support its after-school and literacy programs. Carrie Townsend’s family founded the Carrie Townsend Foundation (CTF) to honor her quintessential life and “continue” her unwavering commitment to faithful generosity. CTF supports non-profit organizations and causes that have a significant impact on the lives of young people through education and sports in its local Southern California community. 100% of monetary donations received are donated and reinvested directly in the community.

“Carrie’s strong beliefs flowed into everything she did because she always put others first,” Bill Townsend shared. “She touched and inspired others with her selfless giving, always smiling, always thinking of others and believing the world could be a better place – inspiring her family to carry on her legacy,” Townsend continued. Carrie believed that young people are the foundation of our future and loved helping them succeed by supporting them.

Since founding the Youth Center in 1952, he has established the organization as a community institution, providing children and teens with a safe and welcoming space filled with people who support and care for them, as well as programs to help them learn and grow. Core Youth Center programs include:

  • After-school program: An alternative to children returning home to an empty house and idle activities; offers homework help, tutoring, hobbies, sports, STEM, leadership development and arts activities.
  • Summer camp: Outdoor camp that provides families with access to several weeks of childcare; bans all screens and offers a wide range of recreational, educational and creative activities that engage children with each other and with nature.
  • Music program: after-school music program conducted in partnership with the Los Alamitos Unified School District; rope and band instruction provided to children in grades K-5; students in grades 1 to 5 can participate in the elementary string ensemble or the jazz band.

“Over the past three years, the Youth Center has been fortunate to secure CTF grants during very difficult times around the world,” said Lina Lumme, Executive Director of the Youth Center. “Scholarships were awarded, new books were purchased, and we were able to offer more programs and longer opening hours to accommodate ever-changing school schedules,” she continued.

The Youth Center serves more than 3,000 young people aged 5 to 18 each year. For more information on the Carrie Townsend Foundation, visit www.CarrieTownsendFoundation.org. For more information on the Youth Center, visit www.TheYouthCenter.org.

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the new youth center is the topic – WGAU https://jukuz.net/the-new-youth-center-is-the-topic-wgau/ Thu, 19 May 2022 09:30:57 +0000 https://jukuz.net/the-new-youth-center-is-the-topic-wgau/ An open house on plans for a sales tax-funded youth and community enrichment center is scheduled for tonight at the Rocksprings Park Community Center. On the Athens-Clarke Co government website… A SPLOST 2011 Project #22 – Youth and Community Enrichment Facility Partnership Site Criteria Open House will be held on Thursday, May 19, 2022 from […]]]>

An open house on plans for a sales tax-funded youth and community enrichment center is scheduled for tonight at the Rocksprings Park Community Center.

On the Athens-Clarke Co government website…

A SPLOST 2011 Project #22 – Youth and Community Enrichment Facility Partnership Site Criteria Open House will be held on Thursday, May 19, 2022 from 6:30-8:00 p.m. at the Rocksprings Park Community Center at 291 Henderson Extension.

The open house will provide residents with the opportunity to view and comment on the proposed criteria for determining the best location for the new facility. Possible sites will be evaluated against final criteria that will be approved by the Mayor and the Commission after hearing recommendations from the SPLOST Site Selection Committee, a residents’ committee appointed by Mayor Kelly Girtz and chaired by the District 8 Commissioner. Carol Myers.

The open house is a walk-in format with information provided on each of the criteria. ACCGov staff and members of the SPLOST site selection committee will also be present at the open house to answer questions about the criteria. No official presentation will be given.

An online survey is also available at www.accgov.com/splost until Sunday, May 22 for resident feedback. The survey also includes information on the proposed site criteria, area maps and project process.

Once the criteria are approved by the Mayor and the Commission, the SPLOST Site Selection Committee will begin the process of reviewing candidate sites, conduct an additional open house and survey of possible candidate sites, and provide candidate sites to the mayor and to the Commission for consideration. This process is expected to take place throughout 2022.

The SPLOST-funded Youth and Community Enrichment Facilities Partnership Project will provide a new facility in partnership with the Athens Land Trust for youth development and family education programs in Athens County- Clarke. The project is expected to include components such as a computer lab and technology center, classrooms and conference space, associated administrative and operational areas, an incubator kitchen, wood and metal stores, and a garden and market space with an outdoor pavilion and a stage. The Mayor and Commission selected the Athens Land Trust as the community partner and Architectural Collaborative, LLC for the design of the facilities.

For more information, contact the SPLOST Program Management Office at 706-613-3025 or visit www.accgov.com/splost.

Resources:

Youth and Community Enrichment Facility Project Page

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board of directors examines the motion of the youth center | News https://jukuz.net/board-of-directors-examines-the-motion-of-the-youth-center-news/ Tue, 17 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/board-of-directors-examines-the-motion-of-the-youth-center-news/ LANCASTER — The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors will consider a motion from Supervisor Kathryn Barger to establish the Challenger Memorial Youth Center capital project repurposing proposal, with an initial budget of approximately $6 million. The motion contains other recommendations, including a program design services contract not to exceed $225,000 with Antelope Valley College […]]]>

LANCASTER — The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors will consider a motion from Supervisor Kathryn Barger to establish the Challenger Memorial Youth Center capital project repurposing proposal, with an initial budget of approximately $6 million.

The motion contains other recommendations, including a program design services contract not to exceed $225,000 with Antelope Valley College for the design of proposed residential and vocational programs.

The Council voted unanimously, in October 2018, to conceptually support the repurposing of Challenger, a former juvenile detention center, into a residential vocational training center for young adults.

The board also directed the probation service and county chief executive to develop a comprehensive plan for Challenger’s proposed reassignment.

The plan was to include the implementation of a residential vocational training program at the facility, a summary of necessary capital improvements, programming, an implementation schedule, a proposed budget and potential funding sources, indicates the motion.

The proposed program would target participants between the ages of 18 and 25, who have previously been involved in the criminal justice or foster care system, or who are homeless. They would live on the Challenger campus for six to 18 months while they receive educational pathways, life skills instruction, job training and behavioral health and other essential services, the motion says. .

“Graduates of the program can potentially be offered housing close to the Challenger campus for an interim period after the end of the program, to ensure that each participant is properly supported on the path to independent adulthood (i.e. i.e. full-time employment and permanent accommodation),” the motion reads.

County officials are also advocating for $25 million in additional funding for the proposed Challenger project during the fiscal 2022-24 legislative session.

“Further planning activities will involve the development of estimates for the reuse of facilities, including estimated repurposing and renovation construction costs, as well as annual operating costs, as identified by the design of the proposed program,” the motion reads.

The measures proposed by the Commission include an appropriation adjustment to increase the operating budget of the Department of Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services by $468,000. This stipend would cover the proposed curriculum design services contract with Antelope Valley College and a project management services contract not to exceed $200,000 with Deborah Kanter.

She is a project manager and works for Los Angeles County, according to her LinkedIn profile.

Council will meet at 9:30 a.m. today. To listen by phone, call 877-873-8017. Enter the passcode when prompted. For English enter 111111, for Spanish enter 222222.

The Commission can be reached by telephone, beginning at 9 a.m., by dialing 877-226-8163. Enter participant code 1336503.

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Teens, guard who escaped Louisiana youth center back in custody https://jukuz.net/teens-guard-who-escaped-louisiana-youth-center-back-in-custody/ Mon, 16 May 2022 15:45:13 +0000 https://jukuz.net/teens-guard-who-escaped-louisiana-youth-center-back-in-custody/ HOUSTON, Texas (KTAL/KMSS) – The three young inmates who escaped from Ware Youth Center in Coushatta, Louisiana in a car driven by a 21-year-old guard early Saturday morning are in custody. 21-year-old guard allegedly helped teens escape from Ware Youth Center Shortly after midnight on Sunday, 17-year-old Jeremiah Durham, Tyjuan Lafitte and Na’varaya Lane, 15, […]]]>

HOUSTON, Texas (KTAL/KMSS) – The three young inmates who escaped from Ware Youth Center in Coushatta, Louisiana in a car driven by a 21-year-old guard early Saturday morning are in custody.

Shortly after midnight on Sunday, 17-year-old Jeremiah Durham, Tyjuan Lafitte and Na’varaya Lane, 15, along with Victoria Tune, a guard at Ware Youth Center, were arrested in Houston by the City’s law enforcement team. Houston Police Department Midwest Crime.

Lafitte is charged with attempted first degree murder; Lane for attempted second degree murder; Durham is charged with armed robbery. The three teenagers were considered dangerous.

The capture came after the unoccupied getaway car – a white 2010 Pontiac G6 – driven by Victoria Tune was located in the parking lot of a Houston motel where it was kept under HPD surveillance for several hours.

The vehicle was recovered through a joint effort of the Criminal Investigations Division of the Louisiana Red River Parish Sheriff’s Office, the Louisiana State Police’s G Troop Investigations Unit. , the Bossier Parish Sheriff’s Office, the Louisiana Fusion Center, and the Houston Police Department’s Crime Squad.

Eventually, the four suspects, led by one of the suspect’s relatives, returned to the vehicle where they were surrounded and taken into custody by the HPD Crime Team.

All suspects will be extradited to Louisiana, where they will face additional charges in reference to the escape.

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Wade Youth Center guard helps minors escape https://jukuz.net/wade-youth-center-guard-helps-minors-escape/ Sat, 14 May 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/wade-youth-center-guard-helps-minors-escape/ RED RIVER PARISH, Louisiana (KTAL/KMSS) – Three minors charged with serious crimes and considered dangerous are free, allegedly after a guard helped them escape from Wade Youth Center early Saturday morning, and Louisiana State Police are asking for help of the public to find them. Victoria’s air The teenagers, who were all last seen wearing […]]]>

RED RIVER PARISH, Louisiana (KTAL/KMSS) – Three minors charged with serious crimes and considered dangerous are free, allegedly after a guard helped them escape from Wade Youth Center early Saturday morning, and Louisiana State Police are asking for help of the public to find them.

Victoria’s air

The teenagers, who were all last seen wearing orange jumpsuits, are TyJaun Lafitte, 17, of Caddo Parish, charged with attempted first degree murder; Jeremiah Durham, 17, of Bossier Parish, charged with armed robbery; and Na’Varaya Lane, 15, of DeSoto Parish, who is charged with attempted second-degree murder.

Video surveillance taken just before 3 a.m. Saturday shows guard Victoria Tune, 21, driving the three minors off the premises of the Wade Youth Center in a white 2010 Pontiac G6, Louisiana registration number VWY295. The vehicle has a missing rear bumper and the direction of travel is unknown.

All four have ties to the parish areas of Shreveport, Bossier and DeSoto.

Anyone with information regarding the whereabouts of Durham, Lafitte, Lane or Tune is asked to contact LSP Troop G at (318) 741-7411, 911, or their local law enforcement agency.

Durham, Lafitte and Lane are all wanted for simple escape, while Tune is wanted on three counts of incidental to a simple escape.

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Hardwick Youth Center becomes a beacon for young people https://jukuz.net/hardwick-youth-center-becomes-a-beacon-for-young-people/ Fri, 13 May 2022 21:24:31 +0000 https://jukuz.net/hardwick-youth-center-becomes-a-beacon-for-young-people/ HARDWICK – The Hardwick Youth Center serves as a resource for young people, ages birth to 18, from Hardwick and the surrounding villages. Its intention is to be a safe place where young people can go be themselves and meet other children, fostering friendships between them. “What makes the center unique is that we are […]]]>

HARDWICK – The Hardwick Youth Center serves as a resource for young people, ages birth to 18, from Hardwick and the surrounding villages. Its intention is to be a safe place where young people can go be themselves and meet other children, fostering friendships between them.

“What makes the center unique is that we are a city-funded, donation-funded center,” said director Laurie Desjardins. “We work in partnership with other organizations such as East Quabbin Land Trust Youth Educator, Eagle Hill School, Workshop 13 and Stone Church. We take ideas from our children about what they would like to do throughout the year.

City Administrator Nicole Parker responded, “The Youth Center is an incredible asset to the city because I believe youth are our future. Here they are engaged and supported through activities and stewardship. They embrace all seasons and learn that being active is fun and that a healthy lifestyle is essential for a well-rounded being.

She went on to say, “The center offers games, activities and art for them to express themselves creatively. Almost weekly, they take trips to parks or destinations to fuel their bodies and minds. I encourage all families to take full advantage of this wonderful resource that Hardwick offers its residents.

The youth center was established in the 1980s by a group of townspeople – Eric Volheim, Lucinda Childs, Barbara and Ron Newton, Rod and Linda Leehy. Later, Elizabeth and Jerry Reilly joined the band. The youth center was originally started for teenagers to give them a place to go in a rural area. Since its inception it has evolved and there are no other surrounding towns that have a youth center paid for by the taxpayers of Hardwick and the surrounding villages.

The center receives about 90 children of all age groups. They do a lot of activities with them like air hockey, foosball, hikes, walks and sports at Gilbertville Memorial Park. The center recently brought back community dinners where they teach children how to cook and use fresh vegetables and herbs.

Due to COVID-19, they had to limit the number of children they could have. The center also had to plan most of its activities outdoors. During this winter they have moved indoors and integrated the youth dinners they organize at the stone church. The center is currently open and accepts students from grades 6 to 12 at this time. The Friday group with Paula is also open from 10am to 11am on Fridays.

“Our hope is to get our numbers back up,” Desjardins said. “We would like to have more volunteers so that we can bring all age groups back. If anyone has a talent or interest that they would like to share with our teenagers, we would love to have you come along.

She continued, “Our future goal is to open a summer camp for young people. The most rewarding part of my job is watching children grow; connect with them, listen to them and observe the connections they have with their peers.

Any child who wishes to register can come to the Youth Center and complete a basic form. The Hardwick Youth Center is located on the second floor of the Hardwick Municipal Building. The hours are Wednesday from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Thursday from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Email hardwickyouthcenter1@gmail.com or check out their Facebook page for more information.

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