Youth services – Jukuz http://jukuz.net/ Wed, 25 May 2022 12:24:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jukuz.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/jukuz-150x150.png Youth services – Jukuz http://jukuz.net/ 32 32 Daybreak Youth Services fills gaps in teen mental health and addiction treatment needs https://jukuz.net/daybreak-youth-services-fills-gaps-in-teen-mental-health-and-addiction-treatment-needs/ Mon, 23 May 2022 15:02:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/daybreak-youth-services-fills-gaps-in-teen-mental-health-and-addiction-treatment-needs/ May 23 – While the battle to save young people from drug addiction is not new, recent forces have sounded the alarm for the professionals who help these teenagers in treatment. Here and nationally, trends show significantly higher rates of fentanyl addiction among youth, mental health issues, self-harm or suicide, and child sex trafficking, said […]]]>

May 23 – While the battle to save young people from drug addiction is not new, recent forces have sounded the alarm for the professionals who help these teenagers in treatment.

Here and nationally, trends show significantly higher rates of fentanyl addiction among youth, mental health issues, self-harm or suicide, and child sex trafficking, said Sarah Spier, director of Daybreak Youth Services’ external relations.

“Intentional self-harm among adolescents skyrocketed at the start of the pandemic,” Spier said. “We’re still seeing high levels of mental health issues, and the rise in fentanyl has just been appalling.”

They are among the factors why the nonprofit founded in 1978 offers comprehensive, trauma-focused substance abuse and adolescent mental health treatment to 12- to 17-year-olds across the state. With inpatient and outpatient services, Daybreak has facilities in Spokane and Vancouver, Wash.

The Spokane sites include one for girls ages 12-18 to receive mental health and addictions treatment and counseling. Daybreak also offers co-ed outpatient clinics and counseling for teens and teens in the Spokane Valley.

Mirror programs are in Vancouver, where boys from Spokane or across the state go for hospital treatment.

And Daybreak just announced that its new program, aimed at providing behavioral health support services to young victims of sex trafficking, is being run separately from its other programs and in an approved residential setting.

Daybreak expanded its program for young victims of sex trafficking under new legislation, House Bill 1775, Spier said. Under its provisions, law enforcement and service providers can refer children to these programs, or children can refer themselves.

“This is the first in Washington State to be a sex trafficking-focused program in a licensed residential facility,” she said. “This is the first of its kind where we provide comprehensive on-site substance use disorder and mental health assessments. We then provide up to 30 days of stabilization.

“These young people will have direct access to continue and go to the concurrent treatment facility to continue their treatment for substance use disorders and mental health. Then we have case managers who provide support comprehensive and very intensive release planning. We just opened.”

Regarding its comprehensive care programs, Spier noted a May 11 national report on escalating drug overdoses.

“The CDC just announced the latest data showing that nearly 108,000 people overdosed last year, which is the highest on record in the United States, and the main driver is fentanyl,” said Spier. “That’s something we see at Daybreak; we treat young people who are addicted to fentanyl, and we’ve seen an increase of almost 60%, by our estimates, in the last year to a year and a half.

“It’s unlike anything that’s ever been seen.”

Daybreak is the state’s largest youth Medicaid treatment provider, Spier said, although it is also licensed by all private insurance companies. Daybreak relies on fundraisers to support its life enrichment programs and activities, including its first Battle of the Bands lip-syncing contest at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Knitting Factory. Tickets are $50-$100 for the event with a panel of judges and appetizers.

Spier said Daybreak’s separate Psychiatric Assessment and Treatment Unit, paused due to COVID-19, is expected to reopen soon in Spokane for short-term crisis stabilizations.

Reopening the unit is crucial because of the number of teenagers intentionally self-harming, she said, and to help with the youth mental health crisis also seen in hospitals. “It’s really for mental health and suicidal youth.”

In addition, Daybreak offers Wraparound Intensive Services, called WISe, providing in-home mental health care only to youth ages 0 to 21 and Medicaid-eligible families, Spier said. A youth peer navigator, therapist and case manager work as a team with families at home.

For more than 40 years, Daybreak has had countless stories of successful teens after graduating from its programs and finishing high school or college, Spier said. Daybreak has an accredited school on site that links high school credits or GEDs.

Reagan Cox, 20, is now at Eastern Washington University, where she is majoring in social work and a minor in criminal justice and substance abuse. As a high school student, she entered Daybreak’s outpatient program. Cox was then recruited for an internship to support Daybreak’s Royal Closet, for teenagers to borrow evening wear for the drive home or prom.

“Daybreak really got me out of rehab and into outpatient,” Cox said. “It helped me stay sober and stay focused on my health. I also stayed very close to the counselors.”

If young people come in for treatment for substance use disorders, mental health counseling is still part of the care, Spier said.

“The clinical term is concurrent. Often when someone is using a substance, they have an underlying mental health issue that they’re addressing,” Spier said. “Whether it’s depression or anxiety, drugs are often a cause and a coping mechanism for a mental health problem.”

Trauma-focused therapy addresses the root causes. “This is the population we serve; young people in the foster care system, young people who have been victims of sex trafficking, young people who have been abused, young people who come from households suffering from domestic violence, intergenerational poverty, addiction and mental health.”

Another program helps young people become children again, through its Life Enrichment Program, also funded by donations, so Daybreak youth can take classes in boxing, art and music therapy, equitherapy and escape games.

“It’s fun things to do; they missed their childhood, and because it’s fun they wanted to stay in treatment,” said Catherine Reynolds, who runs the program.

After fears of closing in January 2020 due to budget shortfalls, Daybreak kept its doors open by later raising $500,000 to fill that tax hole and hire staff.

In the summer of 1978, co-founder Bill Yakely was on a tractor on his family farm near Spokane when he said he heard a clear voice say, “Help the kids.”

With a young family and a new vet clinic to run, he didn’t know what to do. When he shared the call with his pastor, he told him that he was not the only member of the congregation to receive the message. That’s when a small group of people started Daybreak with a counselor.

Yakely still visits Spokane sites on occasion. Daybreak is on a mission to “help kids”. Youth are referred by agencies and families, or refer themselves, to (888) 454-5506.

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State Nears Closure Deadline for Sununu Youth Services Center Without Plan for At-Risk Minors – New Hampshire Bulletin https://jukuz.net/state-nears-closure-deadline-for-sununu-youth-services-center-without-plan-for-at-risk-minors-new-hampshire-bulletin/ Mon, 23 May 2022 09:51:18 +0000 https://jukuz.net/state-nears-closure-deadline-for-sununu-youth-services-center-without-plan-for-at-risk-minors-new-hampshire-bulletin/ Lawmakers last year gave the state Department of Health and Human Services until March 1, 2023 to close the Sununu Youth Services Center and relocate the five to 10 minors who are usually there. detained. Last week they killed the bill that would have given the department the money, the guidance and the power to […]]]>

Lawmakers last year gave the state Department of Health and Human Services until March 1, 2023 to close the Sununu Youth Services Center and relocate the five to 10 minors who are usually there. detained. Last week they killed the bill that would have given the department the money, the guidance and the power to meet that deadline.

Unless lawmakers fast-track legislation in the next session extending the deadline, the department will have to send minors out of state if it can’t find other options here. “I think we have to (act quickly) because this state would be at a lot of risk if we hadn’t done anything” before March 1, said Sen. Cindy Rosenwald, a Nashua Democrat who has been working on this issue for years. .

In an emailed statement, Health and Human Services spokesman Jake Leon said the agency saw no option but to seek approval from the Legislature to build. a new facility.

“The state continues to have an obligation to provide children with an appropriate level of care in an appropriate setting,” he said. “Youths on trial in New Hampshire should be institutionalized or detained in an appropriate setting. As (Sununu Youth Services Center) is the only facility in the state that meets this standard, and out-of-state alternatives are largely unavailable and certainly not in the best interests of a child or family, we remain committed to securing a legislative resolution by March 2023.

Both rooms are past Senate Bill 458, but each made changes that the other ultimately did not accept. A last-ditch effort Thursday to find a compromise fell through when House negotiators insisted that a new facility have only 12 beds and their Senate counterparts insisted that there be 12 with the possibility of add six. Rosenwald argued that the extra beds would provide space for increased admissions, but would be intended to provide space to separate children for safety reasons.

To alleviate concerns that the department would routinely fill extra beds, Rosenwald proposed allowing the department to hire enough staff to watch only 12 children, not 18.

“I think of it as a number of beds more than a number of children,” she said Thursday during the House and Senate negotiations. “If we allow them to employ up to 18 people, guess what? They go.”

Late Thursday afternoon, Senator Sharon Carson, Republican for Londonderry and chair of the committee negotiating a resolution, concluded that the disagreement over the beds was insurmountable.

“I don’t see a convergence of minds on this particular issue,” she told the committee. “I think we are at an impasse.

SB 458’s demise came after months of negotiations between lawmakers, health and human services and attorneys. After a number of amendments, the bill won the support of children’s advocates.

“It’s better. It really is better,” Karen Rosenberg, policy director of the Disability Rights Center of New Hampshire, told lawmakers at the meeting. “Perfection is the day every child receives their treatment even before to commit any offense and we never have children there. I wish we were there. We are not there yet.

In an email Friday, Rosenberg said his organization was concerned there were no plans after the center closed.

“We are disappointed that the Legislative Assembly was unable to compromise on a solution that would allow for a smooth transition from (Sununu Youth Services Center) to a state-run therapeutic facility” , she said. “Since, under current law, (the center) is required to close on March 1, 2023, we are concerned that, without a suitable alternative in the state, the needs of some of New Hampshire’s most vulnerable children will not be met. .”

There has long been bipartisan support for the closure of the 144-bed Sununu Youth Services Centre, a gated facility in Manchester for juveniles aged 13 to 17 brought to justice. The size of a new establishment was the roadblock.

In an effort to reduce the need for a large juvenile detention center, lawmakers have taken steps in recent years to divert children away from the center and into in-home treatment and support services for them and their families. . Lawmakers also tightened the types of offenses that make a child eligible for internment and created the Office of the Children’s Advocate, an independent watchdog on the state’s handling of juvenile cases.

SB 458 would have further limited the ability of courts to engage youth and expanded their ability to seek alternative solutions. The bill would have required the state to operate the facility, a priority for child welfare advocates who said privatizing it would limit the state’s ability to monitor residents’ treatment.

Senator Gary Daniels, a Republican from Milford, sponsored SB 458 based on the recommendations of a study committee he chaired this summer. These recommendations included an 18-bed, state-run, locked facility with a family-like design where minors received therapeutic and trauma-informed care.

In an interview, Daniels said he expects work on another tentative fix to begin soon.

“I think the Legislature and the department are going to have a lot of work to do this summer,” he said, “and try to find a solution that will meet the directive given by the Legislature” to close the facility before on March 1, 2023.

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Council laces up its skates for youth services https://jukuz.net/council-laces-up-its-skates-for-youth-services/ Wed, 18 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/council-laces-up-its-skates-for-youth-services/ Andy Stelman and Christine Perkins at the new shelter Christine Perkins took up her new role just a few weeks ago and is already moving around the Bishop’s Castle community to make connections. Bishop’s Castle Borough Council works in partnership with the South Shropshire Youth Forum and recently won an £18,000 grant from Severn Trent […]]]>
Andy Stelman and Christine Perkins at the new shelter

Christine Perkins took up her new role just a few weeks ago and is already moving around the Bishop’s Castle community to make connections.

Bishop’s Castle Borough Council works in partnership with the South Shropshire Youth Forum and recently won an £18,000 grant from Severn Trent Water’s Community Fund to help set up a youth club and drop-in center for older teenagers of the region.

Employed by the South Shropshire Youth Forum, Christine’s appointment marks a step change in the city’s efforts.

Councilor Andy Stelman, who led the project for the city council, said: “We have now removed the stabilizers from the bike.

“Hopefully in the not-too-distant future we’ll have something up and running for kids by the end of June.”

Mr. Stelman says he is confident they will soon be able to announce the new premises.

He added that a community space in the renovated former Stars Newsstand in the city center has not been identified for a visitor center.

Part of the job of the new project coordinator is to identify needs for young people and to seek the help of volunteers. The youth club will be for structured activities while the drop off will be unstructured and a safe space for older youngsters to feel relaxed.

Mr Stelman added: ‘I haven’t worked with young people in 40 years and I’ve tended to be the leader – it will be nice to let go.’

Mr. Stelman is also involved with the town’s food bank, which is also looking for new premises. He’s confident of making progress there too.

Among the council’s growing list of achievements is the installation of a red shelter in the town’s skate park, after youngsters said they would like a place to sit.

The city council donated £6,000 for the structure which was created by local steelworker Matt Maddox after young people approved the design.

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House, Senate lawmakers disagree on how to replace Sununu youth service center https://jukuz.net/house-senate-lawmakers-disagree-on-how-to-replace-sununu-youth-service-center/ Tue, 17 May 2022 21:44:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/house-senate-lawmakers-disagree-on-how-to-replace-sununu-youth-service-center/ House, Senate lawmakers disagree on how to replace Sununu youth service center Updated: 5:44 PM EDT May 17, 2022 Hide transcript View Transcript REPORTER: THIS IS A STATE HOUSE CLASH OVER HOW TO ELIMINATE AND REPLACE THE SUNUNU YOUTH SERVICE CENTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE’S JUVENILE DETENTION FACILITY. SENATORS ARE DEMANDING A NEW 18-BED FACILITY, BUT STATE […]]]>

House, Senate lawmakers disagree on how to replace Sununu youth service center



REPORTER: THIS IS A STATE HOUSE CLASH OVER HOW TO ELIMINATE AND REPLACE THE SUNUNU YOUTH SERVICE CENTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE’S JUVENILE DETENTION FACILITY. SENATORS ARE DEMANDING A NEW 18-BED FACILITY, BUT STATE OFFICIALS HAVE ONLY APPROVED A MAXIMUM OF SIX-BED. HOUSE SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE KIM RICE WANTS LESS CLOSURE AND MORE EMPHASIS ON BEHAVIORAL TREATMENT. >> WJUST WANT TO DO WHAT IS BEST FOR CHILDREN, THAT’S WHAT WE WANT TO DO BECAUSE WE WON’T LOOK AT THEM LIKE CRIMINALS, LS WE WILL LOOK AT THEM LIKE CHILDREN. REPORTER: SOME REPRESENTATIVES WONDERED IF A FACILITY IS NEEDED NOW THAT THE CENSUS AT SUNUNU CENTER HAS FALLED AND IS SOMETIMES IN DIGS.IT ONLY BUT JOE RIBSAM, DIRECTOR OF THE CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES DIVISION, EVEN SAYS WITH A NEW CARE SYSTEM HELPS GET CHILDREN ON THE TRACK TO AVOID STOP THERE IS STILL NEED FOR A YOUTH DETENTION CENTRE. >> WE ALWAYS STATE THAT IF WE BUILD SOMETHING NOW THE NUMBER OF BEDS IS 18 AND THAT IS BECAUSE WE NEED THE FLEXIBILITY TO SERVE MEN AND WOMEN SEPARATELY AND TO SEPARATE POPULATIONS BASED ON CLINICAL NEEDS . REPORTER: RIBSAM CAIOUTNED LEGISLATIVE AGAINST CLOSING OF SUNUNU CENTER WITHOUT REPLACEMENT. >>I WORRY WE ARE IN A POSITION LIKE IN VERMONT WHERE THEY SEND CHILDREN TO ADULT FACILITIES AND CREATE SMALL CHILD FORM UNITS WHICH IS TERRIBLE OR SEND CHILDREN TO HOTELS WITH ARMED SHERIFFS MONITORING THEM 24/7, WHICH IS TERRIBLE. YOU MUST HAVE THE RIGHT INSTALLATION TO HOLD THE KSEIDS. JOURNALIST: THE LEGISLATIVES WILL CONTINUE NEGOTIATIONS ON A NEW FACILITY AND A POSSIBLE OWNERSHIP TOMORROW TO TRY TO ACHIEVE A DEAL. CURRENT STATE LAW INDICATES THAT THE SUNUNU CENTER MUST CLOSURE BY MARCH 23, 2002 >> I DON’T KNOW WHAT HAPPENS IF WE DON’T GET THIS INVOICE, THEN THE PHERESSURE IS ACTIVATED. JOURNALIST: IN CONCORD, A

House, Senate lawmakers disagree on how to replace Sununu youth service center

State senators are seeking to build a new facility to replace the Sununu Youth Services Center, while some state officials have questioned the need for a youth detention center.

State senators are seeking to build a new facility to replace the Sununu Youth Services Center, while some state officials have questioned the need for a youth detention center.

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‘Logan’s Legacy’ Honored at Youth Services System Blood Drive in Wheeling | News, Sports, Jobs https://jukuz.net/logans-legacy-honored-at-youth-services-system-blood-drive-in-wheeling-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 13 May 2022 05:05:28 +0000 https://jukuz.net/logans-legacy-honored-at-youth-services-system-blood-drive-in-wheeling-news-sports-jobs/ picture by: Photo by Derek Redd Dara Pond of Moundsville shares a laugh with Kaitlyn Weber of the American Red Cross, as Pond donates a unit of blood Thursday to the Youth Services System’s Hazel Atlas Building during a blood drive held at the Memoir of Logan Fluharty. Tanya Duncan remembers […]]]>



picture by: Photo by Derek Redd

Dara Pond of Moundsville shares a laugh with Kaitlyn Weber of the American Red Cross, as Pond donates a unit of blood Thursday to the Youth Services System’s Hazel Atlas Building during a blood drive held at the Memoir of Logan Fluharty.

Tanya Duncan remembers her late son Logan Fluharty as a caring soul, someone who kept others in his mind and heart no matter what he personally faced. Even when he fought and eventually died of leukemia, she said, that spirit was strong.

On Thursday, community members came to the Youth Services System’s Hazel Atlas Building to donate blood in support of Logan’s Legacy Cancer Foundation, which was established to fight cancer and honor Fluharty’s memory.

Duncan, a residential manager at Tuel Center, which is part of the YSS Transitional Living Program, said they expect to get about 40 units from Thursday’s drive.

“It’s inspiring,” she said, “and it’s inspiring to see that our community comes together and they come here, not just in his memory, but to give back to potentially save someone’s life. ‘a.”

Fluharty was diagnosed in April 2020 with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After remission, he underwent a bone marrow transplant in November 2020. In March 2021, Fluharty relapsed and he died on August 1, 2021 at age 18 .

During his treatment, Fluharty received more than 100 blood and platelet products. Earlier this year, Duncan came to YSS staff to see if he would co-host a blood drive. YSS digital media and communications coordinator Tucker Riggleman said there was no doubt the organization would help.

“When Tanya reached out, we were really happy to help,” he said. “Helping with something like this is very special when it’s within the YSS family. And it’s something that helps others. So anything we could do to help honor Logan’s memory, we’re happy to help.

Duncan said donating blood was just one way for members of the community to do something in honor of his son.

“He was always thinking of others, so just giving back to everyone you can and helping out when you see there’s a need would help,” she said. “Whether it’s blood, platelets, even a donation to a pediatric floor of a cancer center, just to give the kids something to do while they’re there. It will also help.


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The AHM youth service receives a donation https://jukuz.net/the-ahm-youth-service-receives-a-donation/ Mon, 09 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/the-ahm-youth-service-receives-a-donation/ May 9—The Hebron Lions Club donated to Andover Hebron Marlborough Youth and Family Services. The club donated $13,000 to the youth office at its annual giving night held in April. “Each of the past 39 years, AHM Youth and Family Services has benefited from a community partnership with the Hebron Lions Club,” said Joel Rosenberg, […]]]>

May 9—The Hebron Lions Club donated to Andover Hebron Marlborough Youth and Family Services. The club donated $13,000 to the youth office at its annual giving night held in April.

“Each of the past 39 years, AHM Youth and Family Services has benefited from a community partnership with the Hebron Lions Club,” said Joel Rosenberg, director of development for AHM. “No other civic organization has played a greater role in contributing to youth and family programs for local children and teens. The Hebron Lions Club was the first-ever civic organization to reach out during the creation of the AHM in the 1980s. Today this link is stronger than ever.”

The donation was presented to the AHM by John Soderberg, Life Member of the Hebron Lions Club, and accepted by Rosenberg and AHM Executive Director, Tressa Giordano.

AHM offers youth development programs, substance abuse prevention services, counseling, mentoring, a youth theater program, a teen center, a preschool program, and a chore partnership where teens help people local seniors, among other in-person and online services. Located in Hebron, the office serves Columbia as well as Andover and Marlborough.

“The programs were made possible in large part through the support of the Hebron Lions Club,”

YOUTH, Page 4

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Aurora Shares Funding Recommendations for Violence Interruption and Other Youth Services https://jukuz.net/aurora-shares-funding-recommendations-for-violence-interruption-and-other-youth-services/ Fri, 06 May 2022 18:58:49 +0000 https://jukuz.net/aurora-shares-funding-recommendations-for-violence-interruption-and-other-youth-services/ DAWN | On Thursday, City of Aurora employees presented their recommendations to distribute $500,000 in youth violence prevention funds, including money for violence interrupters, mental health care and d ‘other services. The update delivered to the Housing, Neighborhood Services and Redevelopment Policy Committee came after Aurora City Council approved making the $500,000 in marijuana tax […]]]>

DAWN | On Thursday, City of Aurora employees presented their recommendations to distribute $500,000 in youth violence prevention funds, including money for violence interrupters, mental health care and d ‘other services.

The update delivered to the Housing, Neighborhood Services and Redevelopment Policy Committee came after Aurora City Council approved making the $500,000 in marijuana tax revenue available to organizations. to help address youth violence and gang activity.

Council members Juan Marcano, Ruben Medina and Crystal Murillo, who make up the committee, said they approve of the recommendations for $400,000 in violence intervention services, which include:

  • $68,141 to Mosaic Unlimited, Inc., a nonprofit associated with Mosaic Church of Aurora, for its Safe Havens and Strengthening Families Curriculum program.
  • $65,000 to the Step Up Youth Corporation, a Denver-based nonprofit organization that provides scholarships, in part in partnership with Aurora Public Schools.
  • $62,500 for the University of Colorado’s At-Risk Intervention and Mentoring Program, a violence-stopping effort that identifies hospital patients at risk of violence and connects them with hospital and community resources.
  • $60,000 to Fully Liberated Youth, a Denver-based nonprofit organization, for outreach, mentoring, therapy and accompaniment services.
  • $56,000 to the Struggle of Love Foundation, another Denver nonprofit, for violence interruption services.
  • $48,759 to the Juvenile Assessment Center – a non-profit organization that works with families in Arapahoe, Douglas, Elbert and Lincoln counties – for bilingual family liaison and assessment and case management services young people.
  • $39,600 to Aurora Community Connection for mental health and bilingual services.

The three also gave tentative approval to spend $100,000 on violence prevention services such as:

  • $10,000 to A1 Boxing, a boxing gym in Aurora, in part to provide youth athletic scholarships.
  • $10,000 to the Rocky Mountain Welcome Center, an Aurora non-profit organization, to provide services specifically for immigrant girls.
  • $10,000 to Aurora Public Schools for student and family prevention support.
  • $10,000 to Driven by Our Ambitions, a Denver-area youth mentoring and therapy organization, for hosting basketball nights and assisting in the reintegration of youth hired by the Division of Youth Services. state youth.
  • $10,000 to the Aurora Sister Cities program for a youth summer camp on civic engagement.
  • $10,000 to the Salvation Army and $10,000 to Denver Area Youth for Christ for hosting parties for Aurora youth.
  • $10,000 in additional funding for the Struggle of Love Foundation for the Safe Zones program and complementary services.
  • $7,500 to Rise 5280 and $7,500 to Urban Nature Impact for a joint youth prevention program.
  • $5,000 to the Aurora Housing Authority for movie nights and other resident engagement programs.

Christina Amparan, the city’s youth violence prevention officer, said the city received a total of 30 applications in March from organizations interested in grants.

Applications were reviewed by a panel comprised of school resource officers from the Aurora Police Department and representatives from the Tri-County Health Department, Aurora Mental Health, Center, Colorado Youth Detention Continuum, and Aurora Housing and Community Services.

Amparan said the group looked at the level of organization and oversight within the agencies that applied, as well as their past successes and whether the programs were grounded in evidence and best practices.

“We wanted to make sure we were recommending organizations that either had the curriculum or the staff, but also the expertise to be able to provide these services to our at-risk youth,” she said.

In response to a question from Marcano, Amparan said she believes the $500,000 provides “a good starting point” for organizations to help address youth violence in the city.

“There’s a lot of concern,” Marcano said of the topic of youth violence. “I don’t want you all to hesitate to come to us and ask for more.”

The recommendations will be presented to City Council at a future study session before being approved or rejected by the whole group.

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Huddle Youth Services Center opens downtown location https://jukuz.net/huddle-youth-services-center-opens-downtown-location/ Wed, 04 May 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/huddle-youth-services-center-opens-downtown-location/ A new space designed to provide physical, mental and spiritual care to youth has officially opened in downtown Brandon. Brandon’s Huddle space is one of five that opened on Wednesday, with three in Winnipeg and one in Selkirk. Another, Huddle NorWest in Winnipeg, has been open since 2017. KAREN MCKINLEY/THE BRANDON SUN […]]]>



A new space designed to provide physical, mental and spiritual care to youth has officially opened in downtown Brandon.

Brandon’s Huddle space is one of five that opened on Wednesday, with three in Winnipeg and one in Selkirk. Another, Huddle NorWest in Winnipeg, has been open since 2017.



KAREN MCKINLEY/THE BRANDON SUN

Several young councilors and guests who attended the official opening of Huddle in downtown Brandon gathered outside to cheer on the unveiling of the Youth Mental Health and Social Work sign on Wednesday. Among them were Reg Helwer, MPP for Brandon West; Len Isleifson, MPP for Brandon East; Sarah Guillemard, Minister of Mental Health and Community Wellness; Dwayne Dyck, executive director of Westman Youth for Christ; Sachi Villanueva, City of Brandon Youth Advisory Council; Economic Development, Investment and Trade Minister Cliff Cullen and Brandon Mayor Rick Chrest.

In March 2021, the Manitoba government invested $1.92 million for the creation of the five Huddle sites to expand integrated services for youth in the province. Charities led by United Way in Winnipeg have agreed to invest an additional $3.41 million over three years. The exact amount for Huddle Brandon was not available at press time.

Created in partnership with young people, it is more than a social service site. Huddle Brandon is a community space where young people can find comprehensive, non-judgmental help, said Dwayne Dyck, executive director of Westman Youth For Christ, one of the agencies involved with Huddle Brandon.

This initiative not only facilitates access to mental health care, but creates a safe space for young people seeking help. There had been a soft opening to connect people to services, and now they are eager to spread the word.

There’s been a real need for a space like Huddle for years, Dyck said. Organizations have difficulty offering comprehensive services to young people.

Dyck recalled Westman Youth for Christ and several other stakeholders, including Prairie Mountain Health and the City of Brandon, had a virtual meeting to talk about an integrated service site and found they could apply to have one, but they had very little time.

“We heard about it and thought it was great, but then found out we had a week to file the application,” Dyck said. “Everyone involved pulled together to get everything we needed, and it shows how badly we need it.”

Having a location in downtown Brandon has its advantages, like being visible and central, but there are some downsides to being downtown like accessibility for young people who don’t live downtown, Dyck said. . The important thing for him, however, is that the organization is open to all young people.

Having multiple Huddle locations shows that it’s okay for young people to want to ask for help with their challenges, said Sachi Villanueva, a member of the city’s Youth Advisory Council. Having one place to get multiple related services in the city will make finding help less overwhelming for those looking for help.

“Involving young people in decision-making is crucial, and the creation of Huddle ensures that there are ways to provide accessible mental health for young people who have struggled to get support on their journey,” she said. “I believe it is built on a solid foundation of trust with the best interests of young people in mind.”

She said Huddle’s team includes a wide range of ages and gender identities so they can relate to a variety of people seeking help and fill the gaps for underrepresented groups. .

The provincial government is aware of the growing need and gaps in services for young people, said Minister of Mental Health and Community Wellness, Sarah Guillemard.

“We are here to celebrate the work being done at these sites to support the mental health and well-being of young adults in this province,” Guillemard said. “They give hope to all who are struggling.”

It’s not just about accessing formal services, but connecting with someone who understands their plight as a young peer who has gone through similar experiences.

A service like this would have been great to have when she was a teenager, Guillemard said. Services were available in pockets through churches or community gatherings, but one had to travel between them to get needed care.

In many cases, individual groups want to help but may not have the expertise. At Huddle, everyone is immediately connected to all aspects of care.

“It fills a need that’s been around for years and we’ll only see it grow,” she said.

To learn more about Huddle, visit huddlemanitoba.ca/.

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]]> Long troubled Sequel TSI youth services center to close and reopen https://jukuz.net/long-troubled-sequel-tsi-youth-services-center-to-close-and-reopen/ Tue, 03 May 2022 03:08:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/long-troubled-sequel-tsi-youth-services-center-to-close-and-reopen/ OWENS CROSS ROADS, Ala. (WAFF) – The Sequel TSI facility in Owens Cross Roads will close on Saturday. The same establishment will reopen under a new name with new services while a lawyer prepares to file another lawsuit against the establishment. Sequel TSI at Owens Cross Roads emailed a statement that read, “TSI Owens Cross […]]]>

OWENS CROSS ROADS, Ala. (WAFF) – The Sequel TSI facility in Owens Cross Roads will close on Saturday. The same establishment will reopen under a new name with new services while a lawyer prepares to file another lawsuit against the establishment.

Sequel TSI at Owens Cross Roads emailed a statement that read, “TSI Owens Cross Roads will be closing 4/30/22 due to program restructuring and service line transition. We have worked successfully with affected DHR counties to ensure a safe and orderly transition of the children in our care. We are now in the planning phase of opening a new state-of-the-art building which will provide new services as Brighter Path Owens Cross Roads.

Staff from the Alabama Disability Advocacy Program say the place exhibited unsafe living conditions, staff abuse and neglect, and improper and excessive use of restraints. No children are currently detained inside the facility.

The restructuring of Owens Cross Roads Sequel TSI as Brighter Path follows a company-wide name change according to an affidavit. The parent company legally changed its name from Sequel TSI of Alabama to Brighter Path of Alabama.

Lawyer Tommy James says he thinks this is only a cosmetic change and will not impact the quality of services at the facility. Tommy James is a lawyer who focuses on troubled youth centers like Sequel. He says 90% of his cases come from residents of Sequel.

“There’s a wave of bad publicity following cases of abuse and neglect, and then they try to rebrand, thinking people will forget what happened at their facilities under different names than origin,” James said.

James already has three lawsuits pending in the state of Alabama against other Sequel facilities, but he is now preparing to sue the Sequel facility in Owens Cross Roads.

He accuses the staff of breaking a girl’s jaw.

“A member of staff threw our client to the ground and our client was face down,” James said. “The staff member had her knees on her back and the other residents were standing on both hands to hold her down. “

He says other staff and residents stood there and watched as the girl was attacked.

James says the company and name changes are causing minor problems in his ongoing lawsuits. Sequel TSI in Tuskegee is also transitioning to another company name – Alive.

According to an affidavit, Viviant’s management is based in Virginia, but James says its national headquarters are still in Huntsville, Alabama.

“That’s still where compliance is, that’s still where risk management is, that’s the head office number in Huntsville, and the number still says Sequel Youth and Family Services,” James said. .

He says he will continue to sue the children’s business he represents. “They play games: dodge, delay and refuse,” James said. “They’re delaying the inevitable because we’re going to hold them accountable for what they do at these facilities.”

TSI Suite at Owens Cross Roads did not respond to a request for comment on the abuse case and when they will reopen as Brighter Path.

Copyright 2022 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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San Diego County Offers Community Grant Program for K-12 Youth Services | News https://jukuz.net/san-diego-county-offers-community-grant-program-for-k-12-youth-services-news/ Mon, 02 May 2022 22:55:55 +0000 https://jukuz.net/san-diego-county-offers-community-grant-program-for-k-12-youth-services-news/ The county announced today that grants of up to $250,000 are available to help community and nonprofit organizations support, promote, and improve educational options for children in San Diego County. County leaders want to help organizations identify and implement new and innovative ways to support educational equity and accelerated learning, support behavioral health needs, address […]]]>

The county announced today that grants of up to $250,000 are available to help community and nonprofit organizations support, promote, and improve educational options for children in San Diego County. County leaders want to help organizations identify and implement new and innovative ways to support educational equity and accelerated learning, support behavioral health needs, address housing, food stability and poverty, and providing K-12 mentoring opportunities.and K-12 youth and their families.

This opportunity is made possible by court-ordered fines tied to the district attorney’s successful prosecution of one of the nation’s largest fraud schemes targeting state dollars earmarked for K-12 education.

“It’s truly gratifying for our team at the District Attorney’s Office to see millions of dollars that have been recovered in restitution in our massive public corruption lawsuits being used to care for our children by reducing inequality. and improving opportunities for San Diego County students.” said San Diego County District Attorney Summer Stephan.

Last fall, a task force was convened to help identify areas of need that could positively impact K-12 youth in our community. Representatives from the District Attorney’s Office, the Office of Equity and Racial Justice, the Health and Human Services Agency, Behavioral Health Services and Child Protective Services, industry youth from Live Well San Diego and the County Office of Education participated in this important effort.

“It’s critical to provide students with the tools to not only survive, but also thrive in life,” said San Diego County Schools Superintendent Dr. Paul Gothold. “But schools cannot do it alone. This grant program will help support students, families, and communities with high-impact partnerships, holistic services, and deeper learning. By working with our partners, we can fully prepare students for the world as it is today so they can forge the future they want and we all need.

The county uses these funds to provide opportunities for small community organizations to launch promising new programs or expand existing programs to improve educational outcomes and reduce inequities and disparities in our communities.

Proposals for the K-12 Youth Services Community Grant must focus on one or more of the following areas:

  • Equity in Education/Accelerated Learning
  • Behavioral health needs
  • Housing, food stability, poverty
  • Mentoring

Organizations interested in applying for a K-12 Youth Services Community Grant must apply by 5 p.m. Friday, June 3. Grants are expected to range from $50,000 to $250,000 and be used for a maximum period of twelve months.

For more information or to apply, visit sandiegocounty.gov.

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