Youth services – Jukuz http://jukuz.net/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 16:17:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jukuz.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/jukuz-150x150.png Youth services – Jukuz http://jukuz.net/ 32 32 DHHS Issues “General Appeal” to Retain Sununu Youth Services Center Staff – New Hampshire Bulletin https://jukuz.net/dhhs-issues-general-appeal-to-retain-sununu-youth-services-center-staff-new-hampshire-bulletin/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 10:11:43 +0000 https://jukuz.net/dhhs-issues-general-appeal-to-retain-sununu-youth-services-center-staff-new-hampshire-bulletin/ A severe shortage of youth counselors at Sununu Youth Services Center in Manchester has compounded problems with routine behavior on police calls and prompted a ‘blanket call’ to any Department of Health and Social Services worker willing to take an extra shift, department officials said Tuesday. . These challenges come as the detention center is […]]]>

A severe shortage of youth counselors at Sununu Youth Services Center in Manchester has compounded problems with routine behavior on police calls and prompted a ‘blanket call’ to any Department of Health and Social Services worker willing to take an extra shift, department officials said Tuesday. .

These challenges come as the detention center is due to close in March with no replacement plan and amid sharp disagreement among lawmakers over where displaced youths should go. This debate will likely continue in the next session with new legislation calling for an 18-bed facility, a failed proposal in the last days of the previous session.

The option of sending children to county jails has been a new topic of conversationn, no later than this week, but is strongly opposed by prison wardens, health and social services, the Office of the Children’s Advocate, a group of six child advocacy agencies and the lawmaker behind the new bill.

Lori Weaver, the Deputy Commissioner of Health and Human Services, recently told the House Health and Human Services Oversight Committee that without a plan in place, residents, ages 13 to 17, could be moved to similar out-of-state facilities, although few if any have openings, or released from custody.

“I hope I don’t see that day,” Weaver said. “I guess I would say I think it would be a real problem on April 1 if we had nowhere to go for the young people who are there. As many of you know, these are some of our toughest young people.

In a statement, the Juvenile Reform Policy Group agreed. Members of the group — Waypoint, New Hampshire Legal Assistance, New Futures, Disability Rights Center-NH, ACLU of New Hampshire and Children’s Legal Services NH — worked with lawmakers to support last year’s bill.

“The consequences would be catastrophic,” the statement said. “We know from New Hampshire’s own history that children who are physically isolated from the outside world are among the most vulnerable population in the state. Although they are among our most difficult children, with few exceptions, they also enter the facility after experiencing lifelong trauma. They are both worthy and capable of rehabilitation.

The group pointed to Vermont, which closed its juvenile detention center in 2020, saying those residents had been secluded in motel rooms and sent out of state, away from families.

The Sununu Youth Services Center, which can accommodate 144 children sentenced to detention by the courts, has an average of 12 residents per day but fluctuates between eight and 15 at a cost of $13 million per year. The center’s impending closure and uncertain future has led some staff to resign for jobs with greater certainty and has also hampered staff recruitment efforts, said Joe Ribsam, director of the Children, Youth and Youth Division. families, in an interview this week.

“Youth adviser positions are on the front line,” Ribsam said. “To run this facility, we need (the equivalent of) 45 full-time (workers). “Right now we have just over 20. That’s what puts us in this really awful situation.”

Ribsam said about 60 department staff have expressed interest in taking shifts for overtime pay since the department announced the opportunity last week. Staff deemed eligible will be trained, including in de-escalation techniques, and will follow a youth counselor before working alone, he said.

Ribsam said dealing with routine behavioral issues, such as refusing to cooperate with instructions, has become so difficult due to understaffing that police assistance has been requested over the past two months. This is a first in the five years he has been with the ministry, he said. Since then, the department has arranged for soldiers to come in occasionally to “normalize” their presence.

Cassandra Sanchez, the state’s children’s advocate, said the center also needs to fully staff its clinical team, who have advanced mental health training. She called the use of state troopers a “creative” short-term choice, not a replacement for clinically trained counselors.

“They need to know the kids, their background, what their triggers may be, and be able to guide them through a situation or talk them down in a situation,” she says.

This is not the situation the department or lawmakers anticipated when the House and Senate voted in 2021 to close the center by March 2023.

In January, Senator Gary Daniels, a Republican from Milford who led a study committee that investigated replacement options, filed a bill propose one or more new facilities for up to 18 residents, but which would receive funding to care for only six children on a regular basis and another six for “short periods”.

The proposal, which focused on treatment rather than detention, was consistent with analysis commissioned by Health and Human Services, and Sanchez said other states that use prisons for their minors see New Hampshire as a model to follow. She said these states experience more fights, assaults and sexual abuse.

The bill was amended and ultimately failed on six beds: the House insisted on a maximum of 12 beds; the Senate wanted 12 with the possibility of adding six if necessary to space out the children.

Lawmakers will return in January with just three months to resolve the situation.

Rep. Jess Edwards, a Republican from Auburn, is working on a bill that would extend the closing date by three months and give the department $1.5 million to continue operating until then. Edwards said he knew three months was not enough and was willing to extend it again. Sanchez thinks building a new facility could take more than a year, given supply chain issues and the lengthy process the state must go through to contract with consultants and builders.

Edwards said he would also introduce legislation that would replace the center with an 18-bed “trauma sensitive” facility that is secure but would also support therapeutic care in a home-like environment. It would be funded, however, for only 12 to 14 residents. Edwards said the extra space is intended to give the department more room to separate the children.

Ribsam said the department supports the plan and is optimistic it will be successful this time around. Sanchez hopes to see a bipartisan group of lawmakers make it a priority and push it through successfully this time around. She urges those making decisions to visit the detention center.

“I think it’s really helpful for people to take the time and go listen to (kids),” she said. “They are very smart. We check in with them monthly. They are very insightful. They can tell us what they need for treatment.

The Juvenile Reform Policy Group also said it was hopeful.

“During the last legislative session, House and Senate leaders demonstrated their commitment to advancing a small facility grounded in a trauma-informed, evidence-based approach designed for the small number of children who need treatment in a secure facility,” he said. “We are optimistic that the groundwork is in place to reach the finish line in this legislative session.”

Asked why a proposal that failed last time would succeed now, Edwards said lawmakers would have more time to debate it and get feedback from stakeholders; the previous bill collapsed due to amendments made weeks before the end of the session.

There is another change. The House member who wouldn’t budge on a 12-bed cap, Rep. Kimberly Rice, a Republican from Hudson, is not seeking reelection.

Relocating youth to county jails is a second option that seems likely to go nowhere, even temporarily while the state builds a new facility. Health and Human Services Commissioner Lori Shibinette asked prison officials this week for their position on the care of juvenile offenders, for comment and not because she supports the idea, said department spokesman Jake Leon in an email.

“Although superintendents have come to the table to collaborate, all parties have agreed that sending young people to county facilities is not possible under current law and is not in the best interest of the youth and families we serve,” said Leon. “The department does not support placing young people in an adult facility.” He said he remained committed to the plan that would create a therapeutic, not correctional setting.

The prison superintendents objected to the idea when it was raised at the last session. Their stance hasn’t changed for many reasons, said Rockingham County Jail Superintendent Jason Henry.

Under federal law, adults and minors must be separated by “sight and hearing.” Henry said upgrading prisons to meet those regulations would be costly and take so long that the state would have to push back its closing date even later. State laws do not give prisons the power to manage minors. Changing those laws would also take a long time, he said.

Correctional staff are not trained to work with children, who Henry says are likely to need a different level of care, education and psychological counseling. And prison directors do not believe prison is a suitable place for minors, he said.

“Why would you want these children mixed up with adults who have committed adult crimes?” said Henry. “These are still kids who should be treated this way and get the help they need to get back into society and be productive.”

The Juvenile Reform Policy Group said it would oppose jail as an alternative – if the proposal is raised.

“This conversation took place last year, and if such an option were offered, it would be incredibly wrong,” its statement read. “Children are not mini-adults. It is clear that the few children who require treatment in secure facilities have mental and behavioral health needs that require targeted, evidence-based, needs-based interventions for rehabilitation purposes. Housing children in adult correctional facilities is dangerous, would only serve to re-traumatize already vulnerable young people and would be the worst possible outcome.

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Los Alamos JJAB and Public Library Youth Services to Host Community Play Date Oct. 1 – Los Alamos Reporter https://jukuz.net/los-alamos-jjab-and-public-library-youth-services-to-host-community-play-date-oct-1-los-alamos-reporter/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 22:59:06 +0000 https://jukuz.net/los-alamos-jjab-and-public-library-youth-services-to-host-community-play-date-oct-1-los-alamos-reporter/ COUNTY NEWS RELEASE The Public Library’s Youth Services Department and Los Alamos JJAB are coordinating a community play date at Ashley Pond. Following the library’s regular Music and Movement program (9:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.), several groups representing services and programs for children aged 0 to 6 will lead games and outdoor activities from 10 […]]]>

COUNTY NEWS RELEASE

The Public Library’s Youth Services Department and Los Alamos JJAB are coordinating a community play date at Ashley Pond. Following the library’s regular Music and Movement program (9:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.), several groups representing services and programs for children aged 0 to 6 will lead games and outdoor activities from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Information about the Dolly Parton Imagination Library, 1000 Books Before Kindergarten, and First Born Los Alamos and Family Strength Network classes and services will be available from programming staff. The nearby Youth Activity Center will open for parents and caregivers to view the facility and find out what is available for children in grades three to eight after school. Snacks will be provided by Los Alamos JJAB.

The Los Alamos Fire Department will be setting up a mini CTT (Criterion Task Test aka Ground Fire Fighting Course) for kids to test their skills. Firefighters will have helmets and gift bags to offer.

Community play dates have been held occasionally from 2017-2019. JJAB Director Devon Hoffman and Library Youth Services Supervisor Melissa Mackey are excited to restart these events for the community. Previous play dates were made up of no less than 10 groups and attended by several hundred families with children under the age of six.

This event is an offshoot of the Community Educators Network, an informal working group that meets monthly to share ideas, support and inspiration. Local and regional groups offering classes, events, or educational programs are invited to attend meetings held the second Tuesday of each month at 8:30 a.m. in the area (lower level) of the Mesa Public Library. Interested educators can email mj.mackey@lacnm to be added to the mailing list.

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Center for Child and Youth Services Receives Funding Set to End Next Year https://jukuz.net/center-for-child-and-youth-services-receives-funding-set-to-end-next-year/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 03:47:05 +0000 https://jukuz.net/center-for-child-and-youth-services-receives-funding-set-to-end-next-year/ September 23, 2022 8:41 p.m. Job : September 23, 2022 8:41 p.m. Updated: September 23, 2022 8:43 p.m. SPOKANE, Wash. — An empty parking lot in the West Central neighborhood will soon be transformed into the brand new Child and Youth Services Center. Open to all, it will house the growing population of Native American […]]]>

SPOKANE, Wash. — An empty parking lot in the West Central neighborhood will soon be transformed into the brand new Child and Youth Services Center.

Open to all, it will house the growing population of Native American youth and families in the Interior Northwest. Construction of the building is expected to start very soon.

Currently, the NATIVE project is very busy, with people coming in and out of doors using their services.

“It gets crowded, especially during the summer program, because we’ll have the health center on one side and the kids fresh out of sports and swimming on the next side,” said Dylan Dressler, director of the NATIVE project clinic.

To get a little more space, Dressler says they needed a building just for the kids.

“Our Native American and Alaska Native population nearly doubled in 10 years according to the 2020 census, so we needed a larger facility for our children and youth programs,” Dressler said.

Once built, the center can accommodate up to 2,400 people. The $6 million project has been delayed by funding, but $300,000 was just approved by Spokane County on Tuesday.

Helen Goodteacher and her daughter Solana are looking forward to the new facility.

“When we left Spokane, my daughter and I, who are teenagers, really felt it was important to find community,” Goodteacher said. “By building this youth center it will provide an opportunity and find a place for children to gather and be a place to call home when perhaps home is not where they want to be.”

The coolest part: Solana was one of the young people who helped design the installation.

“She will be more inclined to participate in community activism, leadership and different parts of contributing to the Spokane area.”

The Child and Youth Services Center is expected to be fully constructed by next September.

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Youth Services Committee Agenda – Oct. 5 https://jukuz.net/youth-services-committee-agenda-oct-5/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 20:27:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/youth-services-committee-agenda-oct-5/ The New Haven Board of Alders Youth Services Committee will meet at 6:00 p.m. PM Wednesday, October 5, 2022 in person at the Chamber of the Régie des Aulnes to take stock of the activities of the Youth and Recreation Department and to hear and act on the following point: LM-2022 – 0433 RESOLUTION TO […]]]>

The New Haven Board of Alders Youth Services Committee will meet at 6:00 p.m. PM Wednesday, October 5, 2022 in person at the Chamber of the Régie des Aulnes to take stock of the activities of the Youth and Recreation Department and to hear and act on the following point:

LM-2022 – 0433 RESOLUTION TO ALLOW THE MAYOR To I ACCEPT FUNDING OF THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT(CTDECD) AND SIGN ANY ASSOCIATE STATE AGREEMENTS, AGREEMENTS WITH CONTRACTORS AND OTHER DOCUMENTS THIS MAY BE DESIRABLE WHERE NECESSARY, INCLUDING ANY SUBSEQUENT AMENDMENTS To AGREEMENTS , IN REGARDS TO THE TROWBRIDGE RECREATIONCENTER

This article is classified and available for public inspection at the Office of Legislative Services. 165 Church Street, New Haven. By order: Hon. Kimberly Edwards, Chair: Certification: Hon. Michael Smart, City Clerk.

If you require an accessibility-related accommodation, please contact (203) 946-7651 (voice) or (203) 946-8582 (TTY).

In accordance with City of New Haven Covid-19 requirements, all attendees must wear masks.

The public can send comments to [email protected]

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Ana Saavedra elected chair of the Youth Services Council | Community News https://jukuz.net/ana-saavedra-elected-chair-of-the-youth-services-council-community-news/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:26:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/ana-saavedra-elected-chair-of-the-youth-services-council-community-news/ BRATTLEBORO — Ana Saavedra, a financial adviser at Edward Jones Investments, recently assumed the role of chair of the youth services board, taking the reins from Cathy Coonan, whose two-year term ended in July. Saavedra has served on the agency’s board of directors for the past 15 years in a number of senior positions. Over […]]]>

BRATTLEBORO — Ana Saavedra, a financial adviser at Edward Jones Investments, recently assumed the role of chair of the youth services board, taking the reins from Cathy Coonan, whose two-year term ended in July. Saavedra has served on the agency’s board of directors for the past 15 years in a number of senior positions.

Over the past 50 years, nonprofit youth services have built community; its programs have targeted runaway and homeless youth; young people leaving a foster family; mentors through Big Brothers Big Sisters; embedded drug prevention counselors in all Windham County high schools; individual and family counselling; support groups for young mothers; intensive family-focused services for those at risk of losing their children in state custody; clinical services; and restorative justice programs, such as diversion, as well as efforts to improve school attendance and reduce the presence of young people in the justice system.

During her tenure on the Board, Saavedra served as Vice President and served on the Executive and Gala Committees. She has chaired development, endowment and planned giving committees for a decade or more.

Since last spring, Saavedra has been an integral part of the Youth Services 50th Anniversary Endowment Campaign with the goal of raising $250,000 for the endowment from area donors in 2022. Through his example, all Councilors Edward Jones area financiers have personally donated money to create a $13,000 fund to match Youth Services endowment donations from area business owners, members of civic organizations and individual.

Michael Silverman of Dummerston, an organizational development consultant on USAID projects around the world, assumed the role of vice chair of the Youth Services Board.

A financial adviser to Edward Jones for 18 years, Saavedra came to Brattleboro in 2004 to open his second office in town. In total, there are now five Edward Jones offices in the region, according to Saavedra, each appealing to a different constituency. In 2019 and 2020, Saavedra was honored as one of the firm’s Top 10% Financial Advisors nationwide. Since moving to town, Saavedra has also been an active member of the Brattleboro Rotary Club.

Russell Bradbury-Carlin, executive director of Youth Services, said Saavedra has been an outstanding board member and will make an equally great president. He described Saavedra as very articulate and knowledgeable about the many ways charitable giving can gain tax and estate benefits while helping nonprofit groups like youth services.

“Ana’s enthusiasm for our mission and her fearlessness and candor in talking about money – something few of us are so comfortable with – have made her a tremendous asset to our recovery efforts. fundraising all these years,” he said. “Ana has a knack for distilling the essence of our agency to the public – and explains why donating to youth services is a great investment.”

“I look forward to continuing the legacy of strong leadership at Youth Services, helping other board members become more comfortable with fundraising, and supporting the essential work the agency is doing to youth, adults and families in our community,” Saavedra said. .

Some of the youth service innovations of the past five years include Demo Graphix, a youth-led screen printing business; Friends for Change, a summer camp and after-school program in Bellows Falls; Work Today, an on-demand employment service for people in difficult circumstances; and a merger with the Brattleboro Community Justice Center, expanded the range of programs offered and clients served. Despite the wide variety of programs, relationship building is at the heart of everything Youth Services does.

To find out how to get involved, contact info@youthservicesinc.org or call 802-257-0361.

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Officials consider new closing date for Sununu Youth Services Center https://jukuz.net/officials-consider-new-closing-date-for-sununu-youth-services-center/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 19:40:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/officials-consider-new-closing-date-for-sununu-youth-services-center/ A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety. The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago but has boiled over amid horrific allegations of sexual abuse. […]]]>

A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety. The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago but has boiled over amid horrific allegations of sexual abuse. Frustrated with spending $13 million a year to operate a 144-bed facility for a dozen teenagers, lawmakers set a mandatory March 1 closing date. But the center’s fate remains uncertain after lawmakers could not agree this year on how to replace it. Rep. Jess Edwards, R-Auburn, said Friday he plans to introduce two bills for the legislative session that begins in January: one to extend the three-month deadline and another that calls for a new installation of 12 to 14 beds, with room for 18 if required. He told Deputy Health Commissioner Lori Weaver he was worried about what would happen on March 1 without such measures. “The Legislature has let you down,” he said. “We just couldn’t come to an agreement, so we didn’t give you anything in the way of money to plan and design it.” Weaver said she could not predict the population of the center six months in advance, but based on the current situation, “there would be a definite impact on public safety” if the deadline arrived without further indication. . “If this were to happen today, I could tell you that there would be a public risk for some of these young people to be placed in situations that would not only be dangerous for them, but potentially for the community as well,” he said. she said Friday at a meeting of the Health and Social Services Oversight Committee. The youth center, named after former governor John H. Sununu, has been under criminal investigation since 2019 and 11 former workers were arrested last year. The state recently created a $100 million fund to settle the claims of nearly 450 former residents who sued the state for abuse allegations involving more than 150 staff members from 1963 to 2018. Over the In recent weeks, the police have repeatedly responded to the establishment to help the staff. deal with disturbances. Weaver told lawmakers the incidents were not unusual, but a severe understaffing coupled with the “toughest kids” created a “perfect storm” that required outside help. Lawmakers recently approved salary increases for staff, but recruitment remains a challenge given the impending shutdown date, she said. “I think there are a lot of people who want to come and help and work,” she said, adding that the closing date “overshadows the facility for sure.”

A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety.

The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago but has boiled over amid horrific allegations of sexual abuse. Frustrated with spending $13 million a year to operate a 144-bed facility for a dozen teenagers, lawmakers set a mandatory March 1 closing date. But the center’s fate remains uncertain after lawmakers could not agree this year on how to replace it.

Rep. Jess Edwards, R-Auburn, said Friday he plans to introduce two bills for the legislative session that begins in January: one to extend the three-month deadline and another that calls for a new installation of 12 to 14 beds, with room for 18 if required. He told Deputy Health Commissioner Lori Weaver he was worried about what would happen on March 1 without such measures.

“The Legislature has let you down,” he said. “We just couldn’t come to an agreement, so we didn’t give you anything in the way of money to plan and design it.”

Weaver said she could not predict the population of the center six months in advance, but based on the current situation, “there would be a definite impact on public safety” if the deadline arrived without further indication. .

“If this were to happen today, I could tell you that there would be a public risk for some of these young people to be placed in situations that would not only be dangerous for them, but potentially for the community as well,” he said. she said Friday at a meeting of the Health and Social Services Oversight Committee.

The youth center, named after former governor John H. Sununu, has been under criminal investigation since 2019 and 11 former workers were arrested last year. The state recently established a $100 million fund to settle claims filed by nearly 450 former residents who sued the state over abuse allegations involving more than 150 staff members from 1963 to 2018.

In recent weeks, police have intervened at the facility on several occasions to help staff deal with the disturbances. Weaver told lawmakers the incidents were not unusual, but a severe understaffing coupled with the “toughest kids” created a “perfect storm” that required outside help. Lawmakers recently approved salary increases for staff, but recruitment remains a challenge given the impending shutdown date, she said.

“I think there are a lot of people who want to come and help and work,” she said, adding that the closing date “overshadows the facility for sure.”

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State police increase registrations at youth services center https://jukuz.net/state-police-increase-registrations-at-youth-services-center/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 22:46:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/state-police-increase-registrations-at-youth-services-center/ New Hampshire State Police are now conducting routine checks every shift at the Sununu Youth Services Center in Manchester after responding for the second time in a month to three incidents over the weekend. Minor injuries and property damage were reported to Sununu Youth Services. Center on weekends. On August 16, state and local police […]]]>

New Hampshire State Police are now conducting routine checks every shift at the Sununu Youth Services Center in Manchester after responding for the second time in a month to three incidents over the weekend. Minor injuries and property damage were reported to Sununu Youth Services. Center on weekends. On August 16, state and local police were called in to help staff members defuse six incidents. The Department of Health and Human Services said staffing the facility is a big part of the problem. includes individuals incarcerated for serious and violent offenses, and incidents over the weekend are common in court settings, and while we are adhering to federal guidelines, current staffing levels require additional supports to ensure adequate care,” DHHS said in a written statement. The agency said facility upgrades have been completed and enhanced security protocols have been put in place, such as increased state police visits. ensure the facility is able to respond quickly to resident escalations and ensure the safety of residents and staff,” DHHS said. Sophia, a former resident of Sununu Youth Services Center, said she left the facility on August 16. “, she said. She said she was concerned about low staffing levels and credited staff members with helping her get into college, where she now lives.” I just think the government should definitely give them a lot more attention and give them a lot more help, because not everything is negative about it,” she said. Wage improvements for jobs like those in the center were extended last week. But there’s an added challenge in hiring at the facility as it’s set to close in March, and the legislature has yet to extend its existence or approve a new center.

New Hampshire State Police are now conducting routine checks every shift at the Sununu Youth Services Center in Manchester after responding for the second time in a month to three incidents over the weekend.

Minor injuries and property damage were reported at Sununu Youth Services Center over the weekend. On August 16, national and local police were called in to help staff members defuse six incidents.

The Department of Health and Human Services said staffing the facility is a big part of the problem.

“While the Center’s resident population includes individuals incarcerated for serious and violent offenses, and weekend incidents are common in court settings, and while we are adhering to federal guidelines, staffing levels current conditions require additional supports to ensure adequate care,” DHHS said in a written statement.

The agency said facility upgrades have been completed and enhanced security protocols have been put in place, such as increased state police visits.

“Working with administrators, mental health professionals and youth counselors, the temporary increased support from the State Police will help ensure the facility is able to respond quickly to escalations of residents and ensure the safety of residents and staff,” DHHS said.

Sophia, a former resident of Sununu Youth Services Center, said she left the facility on August 16.

“Even in the last two months I was there, the last two months they were headbutting staff, giving them concussions, banging their heads against metal doors,” she said.

She said she was concerned about low staffing levels and credited staff members with helping her get into university, where she now lives.

“I just think the government should definitely give them a lot more attention and give them a lot more help, because it’s not all negative about it,” she said.

Wage improvements for jobs like those in the center were extended last week. But there’s an added challenge in hiring at the facility as it’s set to close in March, and the legislature has yet to extend its existence or approve a new center.

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After recent incidents, state police visit Sununu Youth Services Center every shift https://jukuz.net/after-recent-incidents-state-police-visit-sununu-youth-services-center-every-shift/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 22:41:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/after-recent-incidents-state-police-visit-sununu-youth-services-center-every-shift/ After recent incidents, state police visit Sununu Youth Services Center every shift Updated: 6:41 PM EDT September 12, 2022 Hide transcript View Transcript MINOR INJURIES AND PROPERTY DAMAGE REPORTED TO THE SUNUNU SERVICE CENTER THIS WEEKEND AS IT WAS AUGUST 16, STATE AND LOCAL POLICE AND EMS CALLED TO ASSIST SIX INCIDENTS. OVERALL, DHHS INDICATES […]]]>

After recent incidents, state police visit Sununu Youth Services Center every shift



MINOR INJURIES AND PROPERTY DAMAGE REPORTED TO THE SUNUNU SERVICE CENTER THIS WEEKEND AS IT WAS AUGUST 16, STATE AND LOCAL POLICE AND EMS CALLED TO ASSIST SIX INCIDENTS. OVERALL, DHHS INDICATES THAT THE RESIDENT POPULATION AT THE CENTER, INDIVIDUALS DETAINED FOR SERIOUS AND VIOLENT OFFENSES AND INCIDENTS OVER THE WEEKEND ARE COMMON IN A FAIR SETTING. AND WHILE WE FOLLOW FEDERAL GUIDELINES, CURRENT STAFFING LEVELS REQUIRE ADDITIONAL SUPPORTS TO ENSURE ADEQUATE CARE. A SPOKESPERSON SAYS THEY HAVE COMPLETED FACILITY UPGRADES AND IMPROVED PROTOCOLS LIKE CHANGE VISITS. STATE POLICE AND THEY SAY COLLABORATING WITH ADMINISTRATIVE CAREGIVERS, MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS AND YOUTH COUNSELORS. INCREASED TEMPORARY STATE POLICE SUPPORT WILL HELP ENSURE THE FACILITY IS ABLE TO RESPOND QUICKLY TO AN ESCALATE AND KEEP RESIDENTS AND STAFF SAFE. THIS FORMER SUNUNU CENTER. LEFT AUG 16TH EVEN IN THE LAST TWO MONTHS I WAS THERE THE LAST TWO MONTHS THEY THE PERSONNEL MANAGER GAVE THEM CONVENIENT HEADS AGAINST METAL DOORS PLEASE ABOUT WEAK STAFF AND CREDITS TO THESE INDIVIDUALS TO HELP HER GET INTO THE COLLEGE WHERE SHE NOW LIVE. I JUST THINK THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD SURELY PAY MUCH MORE ATTENTION TO THEM, GIVE THEM MUCH MORE HELP BECAUSE NOT ALL IS NEGATIVE ABOUT THEM. NOW SALARY IMPROVEMENTS HAVE BEEN LAST WEEK FOR POSITIONS LIKE STAFF HERE BUT THERE IS AN EXTRA CHALLENGE AT THIS NEW NEW CENTER AS IT IS SCHEDULED TO CLOSE IN MARCH AND THE LEGISLATURE HAS STILL TO EXTEND THIS OR APPROVE A NEW CENTER. WE’

After recent incidents, state police visit Sununu Youth Services Center every shift

Minor injuries and property damage were reported at Sununu Youth Services Center over the weekend.

Minor injuries and property damage were reported at Sununu Youth Services Center over the weekend.

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Police respond to 3 incidents at Sununu Youth Services Center since Friday night https://jukuz.net/police-respond-to-3-incidents-at-sununu-youth-services-center-since-friday-night/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 17:05:00 +0000 https://jukuz.net/police-respond-to-3-incidents-at-sununu-youth-services-center-since-friday-night/ The Department of Health and Human Services said police assisted Sununu Youth Services Center staff in three incidents on Friday night and Saturday morning. DHHS said in a statement Saturday that everyone was safe. They did not report whether any injuries resulted from the altercations. The department said the “escalations” that teams have responded to […]]]>

The Department of Health and Human Services said police assisted Sununu Youth Services Center staff in three incidents on Friday night and Saturday morning. DHHS said in a statement Saturday that everyone was safe. They did not report whether any injuries resulted from the altercations. The department said the “escalations” that teams have responded to are “common in a locked down, secure setting with a resident population of individuals with a history of serious and violent crime.” a national trend. “While staffing during these escalations met federal standards, it was difficult to address the escalations that did occur,” DHHS said. Police responded to similar calls in August. The department said staff calling for police backup is not common, but is “standard operating procedure” when staff need it. DHHS said New Hampshire State Police and the Manchester Police Department responded to the scene.

The Department of Health and Human Services said police assisted Sununu Youth Services Center staff in three incidents on Friday night and Saturday morning.

DHHS said in a statement Saturday that everyone was safe. They did not report whether any injuries resulted from the altercations.

The department said the “escalations” that teams have responded to are “common in a locked down, secure setting with a resident population of individuals with a history of serious and violent crime.”

DHHS said the center was having staffing issues, which they say is a national trend.

“Although staffing during these escalations met federal standards, it was difficult to address the escalations that did occur,” DHHS said.

Police responded to similar calls in August.

The department said staff calling for police backup is not common, but is “standard operating procedure” when staff need it.

DHHS said New Hampshire State Police and the Manchester Police Department responded to the scene.

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Menominee Youth Services hosts athletic shoe drive https://jukuz.net/menominee-youth-services-hosts-athletic-shoe-drive/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 22:44:28 +0000 https://jukuz.net/menominee-youth-services-hosts-athletic-shoe-drive/ KESHENA, Wis. (WFRV) – Menominee Youth Services collects donations for children’s sports shoes. This year-long campaign helps young athletes by giving them the right shoes. The organization believes this will have a significant impact on the community. Teen Health Educator Camay Lyons says: “Some families are caring for children who may not be their own, […]]]>

KESHENA, Wis. (WFRV) – Menominee Youth Services collects donations for children’s sports shoes. This year-long campaign helps young athletes by giving them the right shoes.

The organization believes this will have a significant impact on the community.

Teen Health Educator Camay Lyons says: “Some families are caring for children who may not be their own, so having to buy more than one pair of sneakers is difficult for some families. .”

Since the beginning of the collection a few weeks ago, the Omaeqnomenewak Wetohkatikamek center has collected sixteen pairs of shoes. They accept gently used and new shoes of all youth sizes and for a variety of different sports.

Because there are a lot of young athletes in the area, Lyons thinks the kids will appreciate the gesture, saying, “I think it teaches them compassion and people are willing to help.” I hope young people will recognize this by coming here knowing that we are here to support them.

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Drop-off locations are 2700 Mianaceotawak Road and N845 Hwy. 47/55, both to Keshena.

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