State police increase registrations at youth services center

New Hampshire State Police are now conducting routine checks every shift at the Sununu Youth Services Center in Manchester after responding for the second time in a month to three incidents over the weekend. Minor injuries and property damage were reported to Sununu Youth Services. Center on weekends. On August 16, state and local police were called in to help staff members defuse six incidents. The Department of Health and Human Services said staffing the facility is a big part of the problem. includes individuals incarcerated for serious and violent offenses, and incidents over the weekend are common in court settings, and while we are adhering to federal guidelines, current staffing levels require additional supports to ensure adequate care,” DHHS said in a written statement. The agency said facility upgrades have been completed and enhanced security protocols have been put in place, such as increased state police visits. ensure the facility is able to respond quickly to resident escalations and ensure the safety of residents and staff,” DHHS said. Sophia, a former resident of Sununu Youth Services Center, said she left the facility on August 16. “, she said. She said she was concerned about low staffing levels and credited staff members with helping her get into college, where she now lives.” I just think the government should definitely give them a lot more attention and give them a lot more help, because not everything is negative about it,” she said. Wage improvements for jobs like those in the center were extended last week. But there’s an added challenge in hiring at the facility as it’s set to close in March, and the legislature has yet to extend its existence or approve a new center.

New Hampshire State Police are now conducting routine checks every shift at the Sununu Youth Services Center in Manchester after responding for the second time in a month to three incidents over the weekend.

Minor injuries and property damage were reported at Sununu Youth Services Center over the weekend. On August 16, national and local police were called in to help staff members defuse six incidents.

The Department of Health and Human Services said staffing the facility is a big part of the problem.

“While the Center’s resident population includes individuals incarcerated for serious and violent offenses, and weekend incidents are common in court settings, and while we are adhering to federal guidelines, staffing levels current conditions require additional supports to ensure adequate care,” DHHS said in a written statement.

The agency said facility upgrades have been completed and enhanced security protocols have been put in place, such as increased state police visits.

“Working with administrators, mental health professionals and youth counselors, the temporary increased support from the State Police will help ensure the facility is able to respond quickly to escalations of residents and ensure the safety of residents and staff,” DHHS said.

Sophia, a former resident of Sununu Youth Services Center, said she left the facility on August 16.

“Even in the last two months I was there, the last two months they were headbutting staff, giving them concussions, banging their heads against metal doors,” she said.

She said she was concerned about low staffing levels and credited staff members with helping her get into university, where she now lives.

“I just think the government should definitely give them a lot more attention and give them a lot more help, because it’s not all negative about it,” she said.

Wage improvements for jobs like those in the center were extended last week. But there’s an added challenge in hiring at the facility as it’s set to close in March, and the legislature has yet to extend its existence or approve a new center.

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